International Feed
Industry Federation

ANNUAL REPORT 2016/17

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Letter from the Chairman

JOEL G. NEWMAN, Chairman IFIF 2016/17

Dear IFIF Members, dear friends and colleagues,

The feed industry is at the center of one of the most significant challenges facing our societies in the next decades: how to feed a growing, urbanizing, world population expected to reach over 9 billion by 2050 and do so safely, sustainably and affordably. Looking ahead, as many of you know well, demand for livestock products will continue to intensify over the decades to come.

I am pleased to report that the International Feed Industry Federation (IFIF) is fully engaged in meeting these challenges and providing a unified leadership for our industry in the food chain that provides sustainable, safe, nutritious and affordable food for a growing world population. And through all of this do our part to ‘feed the world’ now and in the future.

As you will see in this IFIF Annual Report 2016/17, our Federation is working on a number of strategic projects, which will positively impact the environmental footprint, the international regulatory framework, as well as the efficiency of our sector, while supporting capacity development for feed safety in key world regions.

In 2016 and 2017 our Federation has grown from our strengths. We kicked off 2016 with the successful 5th Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC), which brought together over 900 delegates and 65 exceptional speakers and I am proud to say the GFFC can rightly claim to be the leading global platform to discuss critical issues of food and feed safety, technology and sustainability.

We are already planning our next 6th Global Feed & Food Congress, which will be held in Bangkok, Thailand, in March 2019 and there we will address many of these topics while looking ahead and highlighting the strong innovation inherent to our sector.

In 2016 and 2017 we also held two successful International Feed Regulators Meetings (IFRM) organized by IFIF together with Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and I am very pleased this meeting continues to grow and attract government officials and IFIF members from around the world.

The success of our joint IFRM, as well as our long-standing partnership on capacity development in feed safety and spreading of good feed manufacturing practices, are just two highlights of the strong collaborative relationship between IFIF and FAO dating back many years.

IFIF is also an active participant in the FAO-led Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock, and an official stakeholder in the Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership. IFIF will continue to be strongly engaged in these efforts and I am very pleased that this year LEAP approved a new Technical Advisory Group on feed additives, which our experts will contribute to.

IFIF also strengthened its long-standing relationships with the Codex Alimentarius Commission, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).

I am excited that this year we established an official liaison status with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee ISO/TC34/SC10 to work on animal feeding stuffs and we look forward provide expert input to this group.

Over the last two years, we launched a number of important new initiatives, which will benefit not only IFIF members, but also the wider feed chain. In January, we kicked off the International Cooperation for Convergence of Technical Requirements for the Assessment of Feed Ingredients (ICCF), which aims to develop and establish common guidance that covers technical requirements for the assessment of feed ingredients by government regulatory bodies, including new uses of existing feed ingredients.

This year we also launched two IFIF expert working groups to support the implementation of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) and to provide Guidance on International Standards for Contaminants in Feed.

Each of these initiatives and our successes would not be possible without our IFIF members’ engagement in our expert committees, as well as the support of the IFIF Board of Directors and the IFIF Executive Committee. I want to thank all of you for your involvement and your continued support of our Federation.

Finally, over the last two years, our Federation continued to increase its membership and geographical reach and I want to again welcome all our new Members to the IFIF family!

I want to thank Alexandra de Athayde, IFIF’s Executive Director, for her leadership and together with Sebastian Csaki, for their continued excellent work and dedication to IFIF.

I also take this opportunity to congratulate Daniel Bercovici on his election as IFIF Chairman for 2018-2019. Daniel is well placed to lead the Federation in the next years to contribute to the growth of a sustainable feed industry worldwide and I wish him much success.

It has been an honor and a pleasure to serve as your Chairman over the last two years and to lead the organization in such exciting times. IFIF is on a strong footing and I know that together we will continue to work to the meet future challenges and advance our industry for the benefit of consumers worldwide.

Yours sincerely,

Joel G. Newman
Chairman 2016 – 2017
International Feed Industry Federation

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Letter from the Executive Director

ALEXANDRA DE ATHAYDE, Executive Director IFIF

Dear Members, dear Colleagues,

The last two years IFIF has grown even stronger and I am pleased to report that in 2016 and 2017 our Federation initiated and participated in a number of important activities, while strengthening our relationship with key stakeholders across the chain, and solidifying IFIFs position as the voice for our industry globally.

Over the last two years, IFIF continued to focus strongly on our vision and mission with our work centred on three strategic pillars, which reflect the key priorities of IFIF to support our industry on the road to the future.

This 2016-2017 IFIF Annual Report highlights the work we have undertaken and details our accomplishments and how we have managed to positively impact our industry by working together with our members and stakeholders.

This report also includes updates from all our national and regional association members, including feed and livestock production statistics, and I want to thank all of them for their contributions.

I want to thank our dedicated 2016-2017 expert standing Committee Chairs Dr. Karine Tanan (Regulatory) and Dr. Daniel Bercovici (Sustainability), as well as all the Members of our expert Committees and Working Groups for their support and expertise, which underpin IFIF’s accomplishments.

Finally this report provides an accounting of our organisation’s structure, our membership, as well as our Board of Directors and Executive Committee.

I want to thank our Treasurer, Dr. Reinder Sijtsma, for his diligent and continued oversight of the Federation’s finances.

I want to thank our Chairman for 2016-2017, Joel G. Newman, for his great leadership of IFIF over the last two years and his dedication, value and expertise, which he continues to bring to the Federation at the highest levels since joining the IFIF Board of Directors more than a decade ago.

Last but not least, I want to thank our dedicated Executive Committee and our entire Board of Directors for their continued and strong support of IFIF’s mission and work.

Pillar I: Sustainability

One of the key parts of IFIF’s mission is to continue to support and encourage the sustainable development of animal production. To this end, IFIF has developed a number of strategic initiatives to measure and benchmark the environmental performance of the livestock production chain.

In 2016 we launched the IFIF Sustainability Projects Steering Group composed of high-level experts drawn from our membership, which work to closely align and cross-leverage our existing sustainability initiatives, while providing thought leadership for IFIF in this critical area.

IFIF continues to provide leadership and expert input to the multi-stakeholder FAO-led sustainability initiatives, including the Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock and the Partnership on Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP). In 2016 and 2017 IFIF worked to ensure the next phase of LEAP, called LEAP+, will include feed additives in order to link them to the existing LEAP methodologies.

IFIF is a founding member of the Global Feed LCA Institute (GFLI), which is working to use the LEAP methodology to develop a golden global standard for assessing and benchmarking feed industry impact and improvement in LCA calculation and we remain committed to support the broadening of this initiative to other world regions.

We continue to support the Specialty Feed Ingredients Sustainability Project (SFIS), which is now in Phase 3, and which aims to achieve a harmonized approach for the assessment of the use of SFIs in animal feeding on a cradle to farm gate approach.

Pillar II: Regulatory & International Standards

Another key part of IFIF’s mission is to support worldwide trade and ensure that future demands for feed and food can be met efficiently. IFIF works to promote a balanced regulatory framework to support a fair global playing field to facilitate market access and support the competitiveness of the feed and livestock industries.

The 9th and 10th International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM) organized by IFIF in cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) once again brought together record numbers of feed industry representatives and government officials from around the world to discuss critical issues facing the feed sector with IFIF and the FAO. At the 10th IFRM we introduced the ‘World Café’ discussion concept, which was a big success and which will find its way into our future meetings.

Following the IFIF Convergence Project, in 2017 IFIF together with regulatory authorities and feed and feed ingredient associations from Canada, the European Union and the United States launched the International Cooperation for Convergence of Technical Requirements for the Assessment of Feed Ingredients (ICCF). This important international cooperation has already set up two expert working groups with first results expected in early 2018.

In 2017 IFIF was granted official liaison status with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee ISO/TC34/SC10 to work on animal feeding stuffs. IFIF will support the work of ISO/TC34/SC10 to ensure that it is aligned with other international initiatives related to animal feed terminology.

IFIF also joined global regulators at the annual Sessions of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC) in 2016 and 2017, where together with the FAO, we kept feed safety on the agenda. IFIF was also actively involved in a number of important Codex Working Groups and we will continue to provide expert input into the various Codex WGs in the year ahead.

IFIF joined the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) 84th and 85th General Session, highlighting our on-going support in the development, updating and implementation of OIE standards and guidelines to contribute to improved animal health and productivity.

In 2017 we launched two new IFIF expert working groups, whose work will support IFIF members and the wider feed industry in the years to come. The expert WG on Guidance on implementation of the Global Harmonized System (GHS) aims to provide guidance and tools to operators and countries on implementing GHS requirements worldwide to support a harmonized approach.

The expert WG on Guidance on International standards for contaminants in feed aims to identify and maintain an appropriate international list of contaminants standards for ingredients and their mixtures for safe feed manufacture reflecting a risk-based approach.

Pillar III: Education & sharing of Best Practices

A third key element of IFIF’s mission is to support sharing of good practice and to promote science-based solutions for the feed industry and facilitate dialogue among key stakeholders.

I am pleased to report that in 2017 we launched the IFIF Global Animal Nutrition Programme ‘Train the Trainer’ in Tanzania, which focused on increasing safety and feed quality at the production level by training over 60 representatives from the Tanzanian feed industries. The IFIF training had real impacts for participants who can apply their new feed safety skills in feed mills across Tanzania and I am looking forward to continue to roll out this important programme.

The IFIF feed safety trainings use the IFIF FAO ‘Feed Manual of Good Practices’ for the Feed Industry based on the Codex Code of Practice on Good Animal Feeding as a basis for the training materials. Supported by the Standards and Trade and Development Facility (STDF) of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the feed manual is available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French and Spanish and remains a relevant document to help support better standards, particular in developing economies.

IFIF is a founding partner of the FAO-led Feed Safety Multi-Stakeholder Partnership, which was formally launched in April 2016 and aims at improving the safety of feed, and thus enhancing food safety, animal health and welfare and food security.

In April 2016 many of you joined us for the 5th Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC) in Antalya, Turkey. The 5th GFFC attracted over 900 delegates and generated excellent and animated discussion under the theme “Equity and Prosperity for All”, which links to the global challenge to provide safe, affordable and sustainable animal protein sources to feed 9 billion people by 2050.

Preparations are already underway for the 6th Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC), which will be held in Bangkok, Thailand on 10-13 March 2019 together with the 12th IFRM on 14 March 2019. This promises to be our most exciting and future oriented GFFC yet and I look forward to working with all of you in the next year as we prepare for this important Congress.

Looking ahead 2018

2018 promises to be an important and exciting year for our Federation under the leadership of our newly elected IFIF Chairman for 2018-2019 Daniel Bercovici.

In January we will kick-off with our 11th International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM) in Atlanta on 29-30 January 2018. It promises to be another excellent meeting and I look forward to see many of you there.

At the IFRM we will also continue to drive our feed safety capacity development efforts for 2018 and reach out to potential partners as we plan new trainings in Africa and Asia.

In February 2018 the FAO-led LEAP+ Technical Advisory Group (TAG) on feed additives will kick off their work with our IFIF experts at the table to input into this important work.

In 2018 we will continue our efforts to reach out to potential new members and support the building of national and regional feed associations, particularly in the Middle East and North Africa, as well as the Asia-Pacific region in the lead up to our GFFC in Thailand in 2019.

I look forward to working with all of you to drive IFIF forward in the next years to ensure we can provide a unified leadership role for our industry in order to contribute to the sustainable, safe, nutritious and affordable food for a growing world population.

Thank you all for your continued support of IFIF.

Alexandra de Athayde
Executive Director
International Feed Industry Federation

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Who we are

The International Feed Industry Federation (IFIF) provides a unified voice and leadership to represent and promote the global feed industry as an essential participant in the food chain that provides sustainable, safe, nutritious and affordable food for a growing world population.

In 2016-2017, IFIF undertook a number of projects to meet this challenge and continued to develop stronger relationships with international stakeholders, while welcoming a range of new Members to IFIF.

Over the last two years, IFIF continued it’s sharp focus on our 2020 strategic work plan. To support our industry on the road to the future, IFIF’s work with its Members and stakeholders is centred on three strategic pillars:

  • Sustainability
  • Regulatory & International Standards
  • Education & sharing of best practices.

IFIF is made up of national and regional feed associations from Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, North and South America and the Middle East, as well feed related organizations and corporate members from around the globe.

IFIF members represent over 80% of total compound animal feed production worldwide.

IFIF believes that only by working together with all stakeholders in the feed and food chain, including governments, the private sector and non-governmental groups, can we meet the demands of 60% more food, including animal proteins like beef, poultry, fish and dairy products in the future.

Given the anticipated growth of the world’s population to around 9 billion people by 2050, and the associated higher demand for animal proteins like beef, poultry and fish, it is vital that we can meet this challenge in a sustainable and safe way.

IFIF helps to ensure high standards of health and welfare for animals and people, by collaborating with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the Codex Alimentarius Commission and other international bodies to help set international regulatory standards for the whole feed chain and support fair trade.

In addition, IFIF works with governmental, private sector, and nongovernmental partners on a number of fronts to measure, benchmark and improve the sustainability of the livestock production chain.

IFIF also aims to play a proactive role to promote science-based solutions and information sharing for feed manufacturers, consumers and regulatory authorities worldwide on a variety of issues that affect the supply of safe and affordable animal proteins such as beef, poultry, fish and dairy products.

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Education & Sharing of Best Practices

IFIF supports sharing of good practices, promotes science-based solutions for the feed industry and facilitates dialogue among key stakeholders.

In 2016 and 2017 IFIF launched the Global Animal Nutrition Programme ‘Train the Trainer’ to develop and train the capacities of the relevant compound feed production stakeholders in a developing region. This reflects IFIF’s mission to promote science-based solutions and information sharing for the feed industry, as well as stimulate the adoption of international standards and global equivalency.

IFIF has so far held two successful training programmes, one in Nigeria and one in Tanzania. IFIF will continue to roll out the Global Animal Nutrition Programme to other countries to support, train and develop the capacities of the local feed industries to raise feed and food safety standards globally.

The IFIF feed safety trainings use the IFIF FAO ‘Feed Manual of Good Practices’ for the Feed Industry based on the Codex Code of Practice on Good Animal Feeding as a basis for the training materials. Supported by the Standards and Trade and Development Facility (STDF) of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the feed manual is available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French and Spanish.

IFIF continues to encourage countries, particularly in the developing world, to use the IFIF FAO ‘Manual of Good Practices for the Feed Industry’ as a guidance document to increase safety and feed quality at the production level both for industrial production and on farm mixing.

In 2016 IFIF was a founding partner of the FAO-led Feed Safety Multi-Stakeholder Partnership, which was formally launched in April 2016 and aims at improving the safety of feed, and thus enhancing food safety, animal health and welfare and food security.

The 5th Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC) was successfully held in Antalya, Turkey, on 18-20 April 2016.  Over 900 delegates attended the Congress and the theme “Equity and Prosperity for All” linked to the global challenge to provide safe, affordable and sustainable animal protein sources to feed 9 billion people by 2050. For more information and to view the full 5th GFFC programme please visit www.gffc2016.com.

In 2017 IFIF laid the groundwork for the 6th Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC), which will be held in Bangkok, Thailand on 10-13 March 2019. The 6th GFFC will bring together food and feed experts from around the world, representing public sector, civil society, industry and academia.

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IFIF/FAO Feed Manual

In 2016 and 2017 the Manual was the basis for the IFIF Feed Safety Training ‘Global Animal Nutrition Programme – Train the Trainer’. The Feed Manual continues to be distributed to regulators and Industry globally and is available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French and Spanish language.

This manual provides updated comprehensive information and practical guidelines to assist producers and all stakeholders along the production and distribution chain to comply with the regulatory framework, which have or will come into force in response to the Codex Alimentarius Code of Practice on Good Animal Feeding.

The application of this Code is an important step for the expansion of international trade in feed products as well as in products of animal origin. Both food exporting and importing countries can benefit from a more level playing field to support the trade of safe food products.

The Manual is a very relevant document to help support better standards, particular in developing economies and some results from the manual include:

  • ‘Feed Manual of Good Practices for the Feed Industry’ shared with regulators and industry globally as a key resource to increase the safety of feed (and food) production. The Manual is available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French and Spanish.
  • IFIF-led workshops and training reached feed producers and feed industries worldwide, including: over 30 trainers in Nigeria, 60 feed millers in Tanzania, and government officials from 10 countries in Latin America. Workshops have also been carried out in Nigeria, Egypt, India and Brazil.
  • Setting up the Southern African Feed Manufacturers’ Association to help harmonize legislation and regulations, boosting trade among countries and creating a self-regulating regional industry.
  • Catalyzing the FAO-led Feed Safety Multi-Stakeholder Partnership to promote and support global capacity development.

The Feed Manual is meant to increase safety and feed quality at the production level both for industrial production and on farm mixing with a particular focus on the developing world.

Thanks to the project support, feed safety, and, as a result, food safety, continues to improve worldwide:

  • Feed regulators and industry in developing countries regularly use the Feed Manual as a reference for updating and comparing legislation and regulations. Across Africa, Asia and Latin America governments and companies have made changes to meet the Codex Code of Practice on Good Animal Feeding.
  • The Manual is being used to train industry and raise awareness among policy makers and producers. It is also being used as a teaching tool in universities, receiving positive feedback from students.

The production and publication of the Feed Manual was made possible by a grant from the Standards and Trade Development Facility (STDF), a global partnership that supports developing countries in building their capacity to implement international sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) standards, guidelines and recommendations as a means to improve their human, animal and plant health status and ability to gain or maintain access to markets.

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IFIF Global Animal Nutrition Programme ‘Train the Trainer’

IFIF launched the Global Animal Nutrition Programme ‘Train the Trainer’ to develop and train the capacities of the relevant compound feed production stakeholders in a developing region using the FAO/IFIF Manual of Good Practices for the Feed Industry based on the Codex Code of Practice on Good Animal Feeding.

Capacity Development for feed safety is one of the key priorities of IFIF under our strategic Pillar III: Education & Best Practices and links closely to FAO initiatives in this area.

In 2016 and 2017 IFIF has so far held two successful training programmes, one in Nigeria and one in Tanzania. IFIF will continue to roll out the Global Animal Nutrition Programme to other countries to support, train and develop the capacities of the local feed industries to raise feed and food safety standards globally.

As a next step, in 2017 IFIF will monitor the outcomes and evaluate the learnings from the programme in Nigeria and in Tanzania, and based on that roll out the training programme in other qualifying countries to support, train and develop the local feed industry to raise feed and food safety standards globally. Should you be interested in taking part in the Train the Trainer programme please email info@ifif.org.

Developed by IFIF in 2015, the Global Animal Nutrition Programme is designed to raise capacities for feed safety in developing regions by training key individuals who can then apply and share their new skills with colleagues on site within a country. This reflects IFIF’s mission to promote solutions and information sharing for the feed industry, as well as stimulate the adoption of international standards and global equivalency.

Already in 2010, IFIF together with the FAO published the Feed Manual of Good Practices for the Feed Industry, in order to support the spreading of good manufacturing practice and higher feed safety standards around the globe.  The publication of the Feed Manual is intended to increase safety and feed quality at the production level both for industrial production and on farm mixing with a particular focus on the developing world.

The IFIF Training Programme focuses on the Implementation of IFIF/FAO Manual on Good Practices for the Feed Industry. Each training programme is tailor made to take into account local needs, and includes the following elements:

  • Health hazards associated with animal feed
  • Good Production Practices – Pre Requisite Programs
  • HACCP
  • On farm production and use of feed and feed ingredients
  • Cross contamination
  • Sampling and analysis
Tanzania Feed Safety Training

Held in Dar es Salaam in July 2017 and supported by the U.S. Grains Council and the Tanzanian Feed Industry Association (TAFMA), the IFIF training programme in Tanzania focussed on increasing safety and feed quality at the production level by training over 60 representatives from the Tanzanian feed industries. The IFIF training had real impacts for participants who can apply their new feed safety skills in feed mills across Tanzania and I congratulate all the participants for their dedication to increase feed safety and quality at the production level.

Sufian Z. Kyarua, Secretary general of TAFMA, said “the Tanzania feed industry is diverse and we are committed to continue working with our members towards achieving international benchmarks for animal feed safety and human food safety. Through the IFIF training programme our feed millers are better able to understand and implement the FAO/IFIF Code of Practice for Good Animal Feeding and other Codex standards, including hazards associated with animal feed, good production practices, cross contamination, and sampling and analysis.”

Nigeria Feed Safety Training

Held in October 2015, the IFIF training event in Lagos supported by the Nigerian Institute of Animal Science (NIAS) brought together over 30 representatives from the Nigerian feed industries, who will act as multipliers by sharing the training with colleagues throughout Nigeria.

Dr. Godwin Oyediji, Registrar and Chief Executive of the Nigerian Institute of Animal Science (NIAS), said, “current laws in Nigeria are still weak and some are without enforcement powers. But Nigeria is making steady progress on feed legislation to achieve international benchmarks for animal feed safety and human food safety.” Dr. Oyediji added “the industry is being mobilised to embrace the FAO/IFIF Code of Practice for Good Animal Feeding and other Codex standards on traceability, contaminants and HACCP.”

The objectives of the Pilot Project in Nigeria were to:

  • Extend capacity building to those countries and industries that lack knowledge and feed safety tools;
  • Secure feed safety growth to governments and independent companies;
  • Introduce systems and structures that are required to comply with international feed safety practices;
  • Increase the quality and safety of feed for domestic consumption and international trade.
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Feed Safety Multi-Stakeholder Partnership

IFIF is a founding partner of the FAO-led Feed Safety Multi-Stakeholder Partnership, which was formally launched in April 2016 and aims at improving the safety of feed, and thus enhancing food safety, animal health and welfare and food security.

The Feed Safety Multi-Stakeholder Partnership is undertaking a number of initiatives to support feed safety:

As global compound feed production continues to expand, especially in the developing world, IFIF continues to work with the FAO on Capacity Development for Feed Safety, an important effort that will continue on in the next years.

The Feed Safety Multi-Stakeholder Partnership is a FAO-led Partnership for Capacity Development for Feed Safety, with the objective to strengthen the capacity of relevant stakeholders along the feed and food value chain to produce and supply safer feed – thereby contributing to animal health and welfare and enhancing food safety and food security.

The Partnership addresses feed safety in the feed and food continuum that includes feed ingredients, feed inputs, feeding practices, feed handling, packaging, transportation, storage and manufacture. Activities of the Partnership will be relevant to all major feed and livestock products and related supply chains. Some activities will benefit stakeholders globally, while others will address more localized feed safety issues. The primary beneficiaries will be producers and policy-makers in feed and livestock producing countries. Producers will benefit through the development of capacities to address feed safety issues.

In particular the Partnerships’ purpose is to:

  • strengthen and develop technical and functional capacities of producers, policy makers and other operators along the supply and production chain;
  • share best practices and risk-based measures for preventing and controlling hazards in feed;
  • support smallholders in reducing health risks for their animals and in reducing feed and food losses; and
  • create and share scientific knowledge on new feed and technologies.

All activities implemented in the Feed Safety Multi-Stakeholder Partnership will follow a capacity development approach. Capacity development addresses different dimensions: i) individual; ii) organizational; and iii) the enabling environment. It considers social, economic and policy aspects, together with technical ones, and provides stakeholders and countries a leading role to ensure the sustainability of activities.

For more information please visit: http://www.fao.org/feed-safety/background/feed-safety-multi-stakeholder-partnership/en/.

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Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC)

The 5th Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC) was successfully held in Antalya, Turkey, on 18-20 April 2016.

The 5th GFFC was organized by the International Feed Industry Federation (IFIF) in cooperation with the European Feed Manufacturers’ Federation (FEFAC) and hosted by the Turkish Feed Manufacturers’ Federation (TURKIYEM BIR), with technical support provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

Save the date: In 2017 IFIF laid the groundwork for the 6th Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC), which will be held in Bangkok, Thailand on 10-13 March 2019.

The Congress theme “Equity and Prosperity for All” linked to the global challenge to provide safe, affordable and sustainable animal protein sources to feed 9 billion people by 2050.

Over  900 delegates from around the world joined 70 world-class speakers, including CEOs, leaders, and experts from global feed and food companies, international organizations and the scientific community, who provided their insights and expertise at the 5th GFFC sessions and workshops that covered the whole feed manufacturing and food processing value chain, with a special focus on Sustainability, Markets & Trade, Global Regulations & Trade Facilitation, Biosecurity along the Feed & Food Chain, Animal Nutrition, Innovation and R&D.

Addressing the GFFC theme ‘Equity and Prosperity for All – The Future’, a closing high level panel brought together Knut Nesse, CEO of Nutreco, Hubert de Roquefeuil, Chairman of InVivo NSA, Dr. Marcos Jank, Vice President Corporate Affairs and Business Development at BRF and Durmuş Yılmaz, former Governor of the Central Bank of Turkey.

Speaking in front of 900 international delegates, the panellists discussed the current state of the feed and food industries, as well as the most important challenges that lie ahead to deliver on the 5th GFFC theme ‘Equity and Prosperity for All’. The panel discussion with delegates touched on critical issues facing the agri-food chain, including sustainability, how to drive and finance innovation, the importance of a balanced regulatory framework, technology transfer and capacity development as well as free and fair trade. There was a call for better communication to a wider audience and agreement that working together is key to meet future challenges.

For more information and to view the full 5th GFFC programme please visit gffc2016.com.

The Global Feed & Food Congress series was launched in 2005 by IFIF in cooperation with the FAO to provide a global platform for industry and governments to come together to discuss critical issues of food and feed safety, technology and sustainability.  The tri-annual Congress has established itself as the leading global event of its kind and was last held in Antalya, Turkey, in April 2016.

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Global Feed Statistics

In 2016 world compound feed production reached an estimated at one billion tonnes annually. Global commercial feed manufacturing generates an estimated annual turnover of over US $400 billion.

The last years have continued to see an increase in the demand for animal protein worldwide, including for livestock, dairy and fish. Generally we have seen a growth of production particularly in the developing world, with the developed world remaining more or less stable.

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that by 2050 the demand for food will grow by 60% and that between 2010 and 2050 production of animal proteins is expected to grow by around 1.7% per year, with meat production projected to rise by nearly 70%, aquaculture by 90% and dairy by 55%. This already marks a growth factor of almost two, however if we were to extrapolate the growth rates of the last forty years forward to 2050, this would in theory quadruple the needs.

The last years have continued to see an increase in the demand for animal protein worldwide, including for livestock, dairy and fish. Generally we have seen a growth of production particularly in the developing world, with the developed world remaining more or less stable.

Below you will find a selection of data for production of feed as well as livestock globally. These are estimates only and are meant to demonstrate global trends. For specific country and regional information please see the national and regional updates section of this report.

2016 GLOBAL ANIMAL FEED PRODUCTION IS CA.1 BILLION TONNES WORTH OVER $400 BILLION

GLOBAL COMPOUND FEED PRODUCTION 2016 (MIO. T)

Source: IFIF / FEFAC

FOUR COUNTRIES PRODUCE OVER 60% OF COMPOUND FEED GLOBALLY

GLOBAL COMPOUND FEED PRODUCTION 2016 (MIO. T)

ALMOST HALF OF COMPOUND FEED GOES TO POULTRY

THE GLOBAL FEED MARKET AS A PERCENTAGE BY SPECIES

Source: 2016 IFIF estimates / National and Regional Associations

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Regulatory & International Standards

One key part of IFIF’s mission is to promote a balanced regulatory framework to support a fair global playing field to facilitate market access and support the competitiveness of the feed and livestock industries.

IFIF’s work aims to support worldwide trade and ensure that future demands for feed and food can be met efficiently.

Engagement with international institutions is vital for this and IFIF collaborates with the FAO, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the Codex Alimentarius Commission, and other international bodies to help set international regulatory standards for the whole feed chain and support fair trade.

IFIF has a strong collaborative relationship with the FAO dating back many years, and IFIF and the FAO Animal Production and Health Division organize the annual International Feed Regulatory Meeting (IFRM). The IFRM continues as a successful joint effort to bring together government officers, intergovernmental organizations, academia and feed and food companies and organizations from around the world to discuss key issues of relevance, including mutual recognition and global feed safety standards.

In 2017, IFIF together with regulatory authorities and feed and feed ingredient associations from Canada, the European Union and the United States launched the International Cooperation for Convergence of Technical Requirements for the Assessment of Feed Ingredients (ICCF).  This important international cooperation aims to develop and establish common guidance that covers technical requirements for the assessment of feed ingredients, including new uses of existing feed ingredients.

IFIF works to promote a balanced regulatory framework to support a fair global playing field to facilitate market access and support the competitiveness of the feed and livestock industries.

As animal health is also a vital component of the feed chain, IFIF holds a cooperation agreement with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). The two organizations work together with the regards to the prevention and management of infectious diseases, including zoonotic disease, as well as the support for the development, updating and implementation of OIE standards and guidelines.

Finally, feed safety is relevant to Codex Alimentarius work as it impacts on the safety of food. IFIF is a Codex Alimentarius recognized NGO and was actively involved in the development of the Codex Code of Practice of Good Animal Feeding, as well as a member of the ad hoc Codex Intergovernmental Task Force on Animal Feeding (TF AF).

Codex work on animal feed continues in individual Committees (within their mandate) and the participation of IFIF feed experts in Codex work contributes to keep feed safety on Codex agenda.

In 2017 IFIF Board also approved two new key projects, which will support the global feed industry. The first project on developing guidance on implementation of the Global Harmonized System (GHS), aims to provide guidance and tools to operators and countries on implementing GHS requirements worldwide to support a harmonized approach.

The second Project on developing international standards for contaminants in feed aims to establish or identify and maintain an appropriate international list of contaminants standards for ingredients and their mixtures for safe feed manufacture reflecting a risk based approach.

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International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM)

The annual International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM) organized by IFIF in cooperation with the FAO provides an opportunity for regulators and feed industry professionals from across the globe to exchange their thoughts and discuss concrete ideas for providing safe feed and food in a sustainable manner around the world.

 

Save the Date: 11th International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM) – Atlanta, USA – 29-30 January 2018.

The 11th International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM) will be held in Atlanta, USA on 29-30 January 2018, just prior to the International Production & Processing Expo (IPPE).

Government feed regulators may attend this event at no fee and participation at the IFRM is by invitation only. Should you be interested in joining the IFRM please contact info@ifif.org.

For more information about the IFRM please click here.

10th International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM)

The 10th annual International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM) organized by IFIF in cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) brought together feed industry representatives and government officials from around the world to discuss critical issues facing the feed sector with IFIF and the FAO.

10th-IFRM-2017

The 10th IFRM set record for the number of participants from across the world and from key regulatory bodies. The meeting proved yet again an important opportunity for the global feed industry and feed regulators to discuss key issues for the feed and food chain, including Feed Safety Risk Management Strategies, as well as programs on capacity development for feed safety to implement the Codex Alimentarius requirements.

Other topics at the 10th IFRM included a workshop on actions to minimize antimicrobial resistance (AMR), an update of feed legislations in the Philippines, Ecuador and Japan, as well as a discussion of feed related work in the Codex Alimentarius Commission and an update on the Convergence Project, which aims towards convergence of technical requirements specific to feed additive/ingredient authorization across regions.

9th International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM)

The 9th Annual International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM) organized by IFIF in cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) was held on 21 April 2016 in Antalya, Turkey, right after the 6th Global feed & Food Congress.

The 9th annual International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM) organized by IFIF in cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) brought feed industry representatives and government officials from around the world to discuss critical issues facing the feed sector with IFIF and the FAO.

9th-IFRM-2017

Key world regions and regulatory bodies were represented at the 9th IFRM and that this meeting yet again proved an important opportunity for the global feed industry and feed regulators to discuss key issues for the feed and food chain, including a discussion on the outcome of the FAO/WHO Experts Meeting on Hazards Associated with Animal Feed, as well as programmes on capacity development for feed safety to implement the Codex Alimentarius requirements.

Other topics at the 9th IFRM included a discussion of feed legislations in Turkey, Uganda, Ethiopia and Thailand, as well as a discussion of feed related work in the Codex Alimentarius Commission and an update on the IFIF Convergence Project, which aims towards convergence of technical requirements specific to feed additive/ingredient authorization across regions.

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International Cooperation for Convergence of Technical Requirements for the Assessment of Feed Ingredients (ICCF)

In 2017, IFIF together with regulatory authorities and feed and feed ingredient associations from Canada, the European Union and the United States launched the International Cooperation for Convergence of Technical Requirements for the Assessment of Feed Ingredients (ICCF).  This important international cooperation aims to develop and establish common guidance that covers technical requirements for the assessment of feed ingredients, including new uses of existing feed ingredients.

The founding members of the ICCF include the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the European Commission (DG SANTE), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as well as the American Feed Industry Association (AFIA), the Animal Nutrition Association of Canada (ANAC), the EU Association of Specialty Feed Ingredients and their Mixtures (FEFANA) and the International Feed Industry Federation (IFIF).

The ICCF is the result of a concerted effort to bring together feed regulators and industry feed associations to work together to develop common guidance documents for technical requirements needed in the assessment of feed ingredients. This will benefit not only the three regions covered, as the guidance documents will be made available for reference and use by other jurisdictions around the globe.

The ICCF should help to facilitate free and fair trade of feed ingredients as well as support the feed and food chain as it works to safely and sustainably meet the global growing demand for animal protein.

The ICCF Steering Committee, made up of representatives from the founding members of the ICCF, is responsible for defining the priorities and activities of the project and establishing and overseeing the Expert Working Groups, which will be tasked with developing specific technical guidance documents. As this initiative develops, observer countries will be invited to join the expert groups and may be invited as non-voting members to the ICCF Steering Committee on an ad-hoc basis.

The ICCF builds on the work of the 2013 IFIF “Comparison of Regulatory Management of Authorized Ingredients, Approval Processes, and Risk-Assessment Procedures for Feed Ingredients” report, which covered synergies and gaps for product approvals in Brazil, Canada, China, EU, Japan, South Africa and USA. This report was drafted based on expert input and supported by government feed regulators and feed and feed ingredients associations in the seven regions covered.

For further information about the ICCF please contact the ICCF Secretariat at info@ifif.org.

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CODEX work relevant to animal feeding

IFIF is a Codex Alimentarius recognized NGO and has been actively involved in the development of the Codex Code of Practice of Good Animal Feeding and was an active member of the ad hoc Codex Intergovernmental Task Force on Animal Feeding (TF AF).

IFIF is engaged to keep feed safety issues on the Codex agenda following the completion of the work of the Codex TF AF last year and together with the FAO, IFIF participates and organizes side events on feed safety in conjunction with Codex meetings.

In 2016 and 2017 IFIF joined global regulators at the annual Sessions of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, where together with the FAO, we held a number of side meetings related to Capacity Development for Feed Safety.

Feed safety is relevant to Codex Alimentarius Commission work as it impacts on the safety of food. IFIF has been actively involved in the development of the Codex Code of Practice of Good Animal Feeding and was an active member of the ad hoc Codex Intergovernmental Task Force on Animal Feeding (TF AF).

As a Codex recognized NGO, IFIF follows and inputs into in the work of the relevant Committees and participates in Codex Side Events addressing Feed Safety.

In 2016 and 2017 IFIF was actively involved in a number of Codex Working groups including participation in the eWG on the carry-over of unintentional residues of veterinary drugs in feed (CCVRDF), as well in the eWG on revision of the classification of food and feed (CCPR).

In addition, in 2016 IFIF participated in the pre-consultation of documents for the Physical WG on Codex work on AMR and send IFIF delegates to the Physical WG.

In 2017 IFIF further contributed to the eWG on the Revision of the Code of Practice to Minimize and Contain Antimicrobial Resistance, and is part of the on-going EWG on Revision of the Code of Practice for the prevention and reduction of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs in Food and Feed (CAC/RCP 62-2006) (CCCF) as well as the EWG on Guidance on regulatory approaches to third party assurance schemes in food safety and fair practices in the food trade (CCFICS).

This work will continue into 2018 and supports IFIF’s on-going efforts to keep feed safety issues on the Codex agenda following the completion of the work of the Codex Task Force on Animal Feeding (TF AF) in 2013.

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Guidance on implementation of the Global Harmonized System

In 2017 IFIF launched the Working Group on Guidance on implementation of the Global Harmonized System (GHS).

The objective of this expert group is to provide guidance and tools to operators and countries on implementing GHS requirements worldwide to support a harmonized approach.

GHS is an internationally agreed-upon system and it addresses the classification of chemicals by type of hazard and proposes harmonized hazard communication elements, including labels and safety data sheets.

Currently GHS is under implementation worldwide but  in some countries or regions, the implementation of GHS has resulted in questions concerning its scope for feed and has led to some uncertainty on the application of the GHS rules for feed ingredients and their mixtures. This can create inconsistencies among feed industry operators understanding on whether GHS needs to be implemented and how.

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Guidance on International standards for contaminants in feed

In 2017 IFIF launched the Working Group on Guidance on International standards for contaminants in feed.

At international level recommended standards exist for contaminants in food additives but not for feed additives, making risk management decisions difficult. This may also impact on regulatory compliance of internationally traded specialty feed ingredients.

The objective of this expert group is to establish or identify and maintain an appropriate international list of contaminants standards for ingredients and their mixtures for safe feed manufacture reflecting a risk-based approach. First results are expected in early 2018.

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Sustainability

One of the key parts of IFIF’s mission is to continue to support and encourage the sustainable development of animal production.

One of the key Pillars underlying IFIF is working with its members to meet the sustainability challenge – produce more, using less, at an affordable cost. IFIF’s main contributions in this critical area focus on the following three elements, which are overseen by the IFIF Sustainability Steering Group, made of senior sustainability experts and thought leaders form our Members:

  • Promote global standards to assess the livestock production impact on the environment.
  • Leverage and support relevant multi-stakeholder environmental sustainability initiatives with the IFIF brand.
  • Communicate the positive contributions from the feed sector on the environmental sustainability of livestock production to the relevant public and private stakeholders.

Over the last decades through innovation and efficiency, animal feed has proven to be an essential part of the solution to make the livestock production chain more sustainable.

In December 2015 IFIF joined a side event with the International Meat Secretariat (IMS) during the UN conference on Climate Change (COP21/CMP11) to launch a paper outlining IFIF’s work with our members, as well as international organizations, such as FAO, as well as our agri-food chain partners to measure, benchmark and reduce the greenhouse gases (GHG) impact of livestock production globally.

In 2016 and 2017 these efforts have continued strongly and IFIF provides leadership and expert input to FAO-led sustainability initiatives, including the Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock and the Partnership on Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP).

Furthermore, IFIF has developed a number of strategic initiatives to measure and benchmark the environmental performance of the livestock production chain. IFIF is founding member of the Global Feed LCA Institute (GFLI), which used the FAO LEAP methodology to develop a golden global standard for assessing and benchmarking feed industry impact and improvement in LCA calculation, in order to support the reduction of the environmental footprint of livestock products.

IFIF has also together with the EU Association of Specialty Feed Ingredients and their Mixtures (FEFANA) and a consortium of international companies and associations, launched the Specialty Feed Ingredients Sustainability Project (SFIS), which measured and established the role of specialty feed ingredients (SFIs) on the environmental impact of livestock production.

In 2017 IFIF has worked to ensure the next phase of LEAP, called LEAP+, will include feed additives in order to link them to the existing LEAP methodologies, which should also include the link of the SFIS project work into LEAP.

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The Specialty Feed Ingredients Sustainability Project (SFIS)

The Specialty Feed Ingredients Sustainability (SFIS) project brings together a consortium of international companies and associations dedicated to reducing the environmental impact of livestock through innovative specialty feed ingredients.

SFIS Phase 3 (Ongoing)

The SFIS project phase 3 aims to achieve a harmonized approach for the assessment of the use of SFIs in animal feeding on a cradle to farm gate approach. This includes the production of the SFIs from cradle to factory gate as well as the use on the farm and the further recycling or application of manure. Based on this approach, future LCAs for animal products should become transparent, reliable and thus, comparable.

The SFIS Phase 3 is looking at Australia, US and Europe pigs and poultry and initial results have shown an improvement, mainly due to improved feed conversion rates. The SFIS Phase 3 is currently on going and results are expected in the second half of 2017.

SFIS Phase 1 & 2 (Completed)

In the SFIS project phase 1 and 2, the project partners joined together to measure and establish the role of specialty feed ingredients (SFIs), specifically amino acids and enzymes, on the environmental impact of livestock production and are united in their goal to contribute to the reduction of emissions in the food and feed chain.

The overall results of the study announced on 5 February 2014 show that the use of these SFIs in animal diets reduces the consumption of basic feed ingredients. Furthermore the study demonstrates that the use of SFIs, such as amino acids and phytase, results in clear reductions of the Global Warming Potential, as well as the Eutrophication and Acidification Potential during livestock production.

You can download the overview and results of the study from Europe, North America and South America on the left side of this page or here. The results have also been published in the peer reviewed Journal of Animal Science under the title ‘Environmental impact of using specialty feed ingredients in swine and poultry production: A life cycle assessment’ by Kebreab et al. 2016. You can download the paper here.

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Global Feed LCA Institute (GFLI)

IFIF is a founding members of the Global Feed LCA Institute (GFLI), a feed industry initiative with the aim to develop a freely and publicly available feed LCA database and tool.

The GFLI database and LCA tool will support meaningful LCAs of livestock products using region specific data and enable our sector to benchmark feed industry environmental impacts on a level playing field.

The GFLI database and tool is based on the internationally recognized feed LCA methodology developed by the FAO-led Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership.  However, currently neither the LEAP guidelines nor as result the GFLI database, include the production impact and the use benefits of feed additives/specialty feed ingredients (SFIs).

Environmental footprinting of livestock products is a challenging but essential task to improve the accuracy of reporting on the real impacts of livestock products. This includes both understanding where the livestock chain stands in in terms of impact and encouraging the benchmarking and measurement of both individual and collective reduction efforts.

The GFLI aims to bring the major feed producing regions together and develop the golden global standard for assessing and benchmarking feed industry impact and improvement in LCA calculations.

Feed is an important part of the agri-food chain and it is essential that feed operators are able to understand their impact, not only from a business efficiency perspective but also to meet the expectations of our customers and public bodies, at both at national and international level.

Supported by the FAO and LEAP, the GFLI is working to bring the major feed producing regions to the initiative with the aim to become the golden global standard for assessing and benchmarking feed industry impact and improvement in LCA calculations.

The GFLI partners are working to develop and build a feed specific publicly available LCA tool to facilitate environmental assessments and the measurement of continuous improvement, which is both comparable and measurable across world regions.

The database and the tool would be public and freely accessible. The Global Feed LCA Institute has established a formal partnership with FAO and LEAP, to ensure that the deliverables of the GFLI are compliant with the FAO/LEAP methodological requirements.

For more information about the GFLI please visit http://globalfeedlca.org/.

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Partnership on Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP)

Livestock raising and the consumption of animal products make a crucial contribution to the economic and nutritional wellbeing of millions of people around the world – particularly in developing countries. Yet the need to improve environmental performance of the livestock sector will continue as the FAO estimates that demand for livestock products will continue to intensify over the decades to come.

Meat consumption is projected to rise nearly 73 percent by 2050; dairy consumption will grow 58 percent over current levels.

In 2015, the FAO-led Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance Partnership (LEAP), finalized the development of a ground-breaking methodology that will introduce a harmonized, science-based, practical and international approach to the assessment of the environmental performance of feed supply chains, while taking into account the specificity of the diverse production systems that exist globally.

In 2016 and 2017 IFIF has worked to ensure the next phase of LEAP, called LEAP+, will include feed additives in order to link them to the existing LEAP methodologies, which should also include the link of the SFIS project work into LEAP.

The LEAP Steering Committee agreed to establish a Technical Advisory Group (TAG) on Feed Additives. The TAG will develop a technical guidance for the accounting of: (I) environmental impacts associated with the production of feed additives and (ii) environmental impacts of livestock systems using feed additives.

The LEAP/FAO Feed LCA Guidelines reflect a common vision among partners, including the FAO, national governments, private sector organizations as well as NGOs. The Guidelines carry an international scientific consensus based on the input of twenty international experts in the drafting process and a thorough international public review, which took place ahead of their official release.

The Guidelines represent a significant milestone for the global feed industry and will enable consistent and credible environmental assessments with a view to reduce the environmental footprint of livestock products.

Based on this IFIF will continue to work with partners on the agri-feed chain to develop practical tools for feed and livestock producers to assist them in further reducing the environmental footprint of their activities.

For more information about LEAP please visit: http://www.fao.org/partnerships/leap/en/.

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Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock

Throughout 2016 and 2017 IFIF has been closely involved as a Member of the Guiding Group in the FAO-led Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock. IFIF has signed the Global Agenda Consensus and actively inputs in the work of the Agenda, and has supported the development of the initiative since its start in 2010.

In 2016 and 2017 IFIF continued to support the work of the FAO-led Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock.  IFIF is a Member of the Guiding Group of the Global Agenda, has signed the Global Agenda Consensus and has supported the development of the initiative since its beginnings in 2010. IFIF attended 7th Multi-Stakeholder Partnership meeting of the Global Agenda in Ethiopia in 2017 and the 6th Multi-Stakeholder Partnership meeting in Panama in 2016.

The Agenda is a partnership of livestock sector stakeholders supported by the FAO and committed to the sustainable development of the sector. Together the partners develop and implement an ambitious Agenda to ensure that sector growth contributes to socially desirable objectives. The partnership brings together public and private sector, producers, research and academia, civil society, NGOs, and inter-governmental organizations to focus on three areas of work:

The Agenda builds consensus on the path towards sustainability and catalyses coherent and collective practice change through dialogue, consultation and joint analysis.

The partnership unites the forces of the public and private sectors, producers, research and academic institutions, NGOs, social movements and community-based organizations, and foundations.

The Global Agenda work to support the UN Sustainable Development Goals as part of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the important contribution of livestock to the, including:

  • the vital role of livestock to end poverty and hunger, and to improve food security, nutrition and health;
  • the potential contribution of livestock to the sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, to address environmental degradation and climate change, and to improve biodiversity;
  • the role of the livestock sector in promoting peaceful and inclusive societies;

It simultaneously addresses the following issues:

  • Global food security and health: The sector is critical to human health and global food and nutritional security. The Agenda promotes an inclusive approach to managing disease threats at the animal-human-environment interface that involves all sector stakeholders at every level in the development and implementation of animal-disease and food-safety programmes.
  • Equity and growth: Livestock is essential to the livelihoods of an estimated one billion poor. The Agenda supports a viable growth in value chains that have access to all necessary resources and services, and in which the poor can find secure livelihoods and participate in growing markets or take up other opportunities outside the sector.
  • Resources and climate: Livestock production based mainly on materials not competing with direct use as human food, and incentives and rewards for environmental stewardship will allow the sector to transition to existing and new resource use efficient ways of production and a greater contribution to climate change mitigation.

For more information about the Global Agenda please visit: http://www.livestockdialogue.org/.

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Australia

FIAAA

The Feed Ingredients and Additives Association of Australia was formed in 2011 in response to a need for our feed and petfood industry customers and other stakeholders to be confident of the quality and integrity of feed ingredients and additives being used in Australia.

Our aspirations include advocating and promoting the safe use of feed ingredients and the interests of the members of the association and to cooperate with other stakeholders in the interest of the industry. This includes initiating moves for the alteration of, addition to, or improvement in legislation for the benefit of our industry.

We have an active Code of Practice for use by Feed Ingredients & Additives suppliers to ensure quality and product integrity. We have now over 32 members certified to our Code which is now widely accepted by customer groups as being essential to ensure they obtain quality porducts.

Our aspirations include advocating and promoting the safe use of feed ingredients and the interests of the members of the association and to cooperate with other stakeholders in the interest of the industry.

A key anomaly of Australian Veterinary Medicine regulation was the inappropriate inclusion of many feed additives in their registration system, imposing the same rules as for veterinary medicines and pharmaceuticals. Following consistent lobbying with government a new deregulated system was launched in 2015. This has proven to be a huge step forward for our industry  as it still imposes compliance obligations but allows an industry led system to underwrite appropriate product safety consistent with the risk of our products. The system permits products to be sold without product registration provided 5 criteria are met: fed orally, product quality using an industry based code, listing of the ingredient on an international listing (including the EU ingredient register and AAFCO), claims limited to prevent/alleviate being supported by a technical dossier and appropriate labelling.

FIAAA has an active website with membership details, information on its Code of Practice and auditing at www.fiaaa.com.au

FIAAA is proud to be an active member of IFIF.

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Australia

SFMCA

The Stock Feed Manufacturers’ Council of Australia is the national industry association, representing corporate and individual manufacturers of stock feed located throughout Australia. The organisation operates with five state based branches where members meet to address issues. From the organisation’s inception, it has played an active role in addressing national industry issues, many of these relating to raw material ingredient supply, quality standards, Federal and State government legislation and regulations.

The SFMCA has implemented a 2017-2022 Strategic Plan based on the three pillars Standards, People and Sustainability. Strategies and actions associated with the plan are being progressively implemented.

SFMCA operates FeedSafe as the industries national quality accreditation program for stockfeed manufacturers. FeedSafe commenced in 2003 and covers feed, supplement and premix manufacturers. The program is based on a Code of GMP with all sites undergoing annual on-site audits by independent food safety auditors. Over time the FeedSafe minimum requirements have been increased with the emphasis on mills demonstrating continuous improvement.

A close liaison is maintained with federal department of agriculture regulators covering veterinary chemical products, ruminant feed ban, import quarantine controls and animal health issues. State regulators control stock feed regulations including feed labelling and feed standards, with SFMCA working with relevant state jurisdictions.

Industry training is addressed through provision of both basic and advanced training in feed milling. The advanced feed mill training course is being provided to members through a partnership with the University of Queensland.

A major activity of the SFMCA is holding the biannial Australasian Milling Conference (AMC) in conjunction with the Poultry Information Exchange. Both invited overseas and local speakers address current issues and the outlook for the feed supply chain. AMC has grown to be the major Australian conference for milling and livestock production.

SFMCA retains close working relationships with other supply chain partners including the grains, vegetable protein, animal protein and feed additive supply industries.

The Australian feed market has continued to grow, largely based on expanding volumes of chicken meat production. The egg industry is expanding with increasing egg consumption per person and population growth. Both the beef and dairy industries feed demand shows grater fluctuation depending on seasonal conditions and industry profitability. During 2016 record numbers of beef cattle were on feed and record beef prices. In contrast the dairy industry has been hit with low milk prices and uncertainty in the processing milk sector. The pig industry over a number of years has been very stable, some recent signs have indicated production expansion is happening. Other feed demand in sheep, horses and aquaculture remain at lower volumes. Feed manufactured by compound feed mills was 7.6 million tonnes in 2016. When feed mixed on site such as beef feedlots and farmers mixing their own feed are added, total feed use is in the range 12 – 13 million tonnes.

The 2016 winter cereal crop has provided record quantities of grain and ample supplies are available for feed use through 2017. Australia produces canola meal domestically that is used in conjunction with imported soybean meal. There are significant quantities of animal protein meals available for both domestic use and export.

IFIF-table-style-Australia-SFMCA

For more information please visit www.sfmca.com.au.

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Brazil

SINDIRAÇÕES

According to Sindirações, the Brazilian feed industry have estimated a production of 70.0 million MT of complete feed and mineral supplements in 2016.

Dr. Ariovaldo Zani, Sindirações CEO, pointed out that

the increase in corn prices, especially during the first half, combined with the rise in soybean meal in the second quarter, discouraged the cattle feedlot intention and usage of manufactured feed for dairy cows, while poultry and pigs raisers remained increasing housing and slaughter.

During the second half, however, relief on the cost of main feedstuffs rebounded on dairy farming, also favored by the milk price paid to the producer, while the poultry and pig production chains reduced demand for feed, and calves replacement kickback inhibited the consumption of concentrates in feedlots. By 2017, the preliminary estimate is to account for something like 72.4 million tons of complete feed and mineral supplements, an amount still dependent on the recovery of both domestic economy and international trade, and on how confident the Brazilian entrepreneur and consumer will be.

The poultry feed industry produced 32.1 million MT, whose average cost skyrocketed in May/June 2016 (U$ 247.00/MT of corn and U$ 420.00/MT of soybean meal). By turn, both declined along second half, due to relief in prices of corn and soybean meal (U$ 167.00/MT and U$ 271.00/MT, respectively), besides other feedstuffs under dollar exchange influence. Something like 6.45 billion chicks were housed in 2016, an amount that cooled down mostly from July. The insufficient relief in the production cost combined with the domestic consumption weakness were the factors that discouraged the intention of housing, reduced the production of meat and, consequently, the feed demand, especially during the last quarter of 2016. The forecast is to account for just over 33 million tons in 2017.

The production of feed for laying hens, in turn, totaled 5.7 million tons and increased 1.6% in 2016. According to Zani:

This performance was due to further export opportunities and incentive campaigns driven to improve egg consumption, in addition to the slight increase in the housing of chicks and more vigorous advance on the breeders stock.

The forecast for 2017 is to produce 5.9 million MT of feed for laying hens.

In the first half of 2016, in response to the high price of beef, there was a higher domestic consumer demand, as well as, a significant recovery in pork exports, which increased pigs slaughtering. On the other hand, the pressure on the cost of corn and soybean meal resulted in the slaughter of more breeders, as well as, termination of lighter animals, which resulted in a production of 16.4 million MT in 2016. Despite relief on feed costs, and even though the holiday season (Christmas and New Year Celebrations) used to stimulate pork consumption, the continued loss of the consumer buying power, inhibited, to a certain extent, the slaughtering and supply of this animal protein during 2016. By 2017, the forecast is of an amount close to 17 million tons.

Throughout 2016 entire year, beef supply was restricted because decline in slaughter and reduction in carcass weight, as well. For this reason, beef price level bothered the consumer’s pocket considerably, despite the red meat preference by the Brazilians. According to Zani:

The high cost of feeding for feedlot and rearing regimes, as well, and the obstacle for replacement motivated mainly by the calf price, frustrated expectations that resulted in demand of 2.54 million MT of feed. The relief on the cost of calves and devaluation on the price of finished cattle diverged from that in retail, which kept high prices that discouraged the consumer.

The forecast is to produce just over 2.6 million tons in 2017. During first half of 2016, dairy farmers found it difficult to obtain feedstuffs and, moreover, faced strong competition, justified by the lean offer of raw milk, mainly discouraged because the high cost of fertilizers and fuel, corn and soybean used in dairy feed.

In addition, record prices paid for milk, stimulated producers in order to reintroduce technology, which culminated in demand of 5.64 million MT of feed, while in 2017, the forecast is to produce 5.9 million MT.

Demand for fish and shrimp feeds amounted 925 thousand MT and fell by more than 1.5%, mainly due the challenges posed by the white spot virus disease, which overwhelmed shrimp farming, and the depopulation of tilapia harmed by severe dryness that compromised several reservoirs in the Northeast region of Brazil. Forecast is to produce just over 1 million MT of feed throughout 2017.

The consumption of dog and cat food totaled 2.5 million tons in 2016. However, the economic resilient crisis pushed owners to buy cheaper food for their pets. The continuity of this adverse environment along 2017 is supposed to lead the production of 2.6 million tons.

 For more information please visit: www.sindiracoes.org.br.

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Canada

ANAC

The Animal Nutrition Association of Canada (ANAC) is the national trade association of the livestock and poultry feed industry. Our 164 members include feed and ingredient manufacturers and distributors, as well as suppliers of a wide range of goods and services to the feed industry. Taken together, ANAC’s membership represents 90 percent of commercial feed manufactured in Canada. ANAC acts as the voice of the feed industry in dealings with government policy makers and regulators. Our efforts are aimed at fostering a favourable regulatory and business environment for the industry, while supporting initiatives to maintain the highest standards of feed and food safety.

Regulatory Modernization

Much of our current advocacy effort focuses on modernization of the feed industry’s regulatory framework, which has been underway since 2012. In January 2016, CFIA released a consolidated feed regulatory framework proposal, which is the plain-language policy document that will form the basis of the modernized Feeds Regulations. The consolidated proposal reflected many of ANAC’s longstanding positions. This includes the requirement for preventive control plans and the recognition of industry feed safety programs within a risk‐based oversight system. Additionally, CFIA will have the authority to consider information available from foreign government assessments during applications for approval of feed ingredients. ANAC continues to work with CFIA on areas of concern within the proposal, most importantly, labelling.

The regulatory modernization process has been long and complex, and is now well behind the original schedule. Nonetheless, it is expected to be finalized with publication of the new regulations in Canada Gazette Part I in 2017. We would then anticipate a coming-into-force sometime in 2018-2019.

Zootechnical Food Additives

For many years, industry has been advocating that zootechnical products are needed for Canadian livestock and poultry production in order to remain competitive with international markets where access to these products is readily available. Producer groups have also stressed the importance of zootechnicals in their animal health toolbox due to increased pressure to reduce the use of antimicrobials.

Regulatory roadblocks related to the interpretation of feed/drug definitions have been one of the major challenges for this file. Both CFIA and the Veterinary Drugs Directorate (VDD) agree that change is needed and have been working on clarifying the definitions. In 2016, CFIA and VDD, in collaboration with ANAC, the Canadian Animal Health Institute, the Canadian Pork Council and the Chicken Farmers of Canada launched a pilot project to review zootechnical products currently approved in other jurisdictions that have faced challenges in getting regulatory approval for use in the Canadian marketplace. Products include mycotoxin binders, acidifiers, viable microbials and products with stress-related claims.

Canadian regulators have begun reviewing the product dossiers submitted and we anticipate some new approvals in 2017. Enabling access to new and innovative products in Canada will be a crucial step in aligning our regulatory approaches with those of our international counterparts as we move towards a modernized regulatory framework.

Animal Nutrition Conference of Canada

With increasing industry consolidation and streamlining of expertise, the ANAC membership voted in 2015 to amalgamate the two nutrition conferences. In May 2017, ANAC held the inaugural edition of the Animal Nutrition Conference of Canada (ANCC) which was held in Quebec City. The ANCC is a new and dynamic conference that brings together researchers and feed industry specialists from around the world to exchange knowledge about the latest scientific developments related to livestock and poultry nutrition. The best elements of the ENC and WNC were brought together to make this new conference a truly world-class event.

ANAC will host the ANCC annually in May.

For more information please visit: www.anacan.org.
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China

CFIA

From 19 April to 23 April 2016, the China Feed Industry Association (CFIA) successfully held the 2016 China Feed Industry Expo in Hefei, Anhui province. The theme of the expo was ‘Transformation and Upgrading to Build the Brand Image’.

The expo was divided to 12 show and trading areas functionally, owning almost 2000 negotiation booths. The booth area was about 60,000 square meters. More than 50,000 professional audiences visited the expo. The expo played an important role in releasing information, exchanging technology and negotiating the business. It has been already the most influential professional brand expo and platform in the China feed industry.

National Feed Industry Office and China Feed Industry Association organized ‘The 12th Five-Year Plan Achievements Exhibition of China Feed Industry’, showing Chinese feed industry and companies achievements in industry developments, technology innovation, company development and industry service systematically, which boosted the development confidence of industry and companies in ‘the 13th Five-Year Plan’.

CFIA organized the 2016 Feed Ingredients Forum, investigating on the topics of China macro-economics situation, planting industry structure adjustment, animal husbandry transformation and upgrading, ingredients marketing supply and demand, Internet boosting industry development and so on. It set up a high-end sharing information and communicating cooperation platform for the companies to study and judge supply-demand situation on feed ingredients market and utilize the resources effectively. Over 600 representatives participated the forum, both at home and aboard.

CFIA organized the 2016 Feed Industry Technology Exchange Seminar. The seminar invited famous professors including 4 academicians from the Chinese Academy of Engineering to communicate and discuss on industry development hot issues about precision nutrition, antibiotics control and alternative technology under the environment of ‘Internet+’ and Big Data to expand new development space consistently by using new ideas and technologies.

To Promote Feed Industry Standardization Positively

To organize the formulation and revise of feed industry standards is an important responsibility of CFIA. The secretariat of National Feed Industry Standardization Technology Committee is set up in CFIA. In 2016, CFIA organized 6 review meetings and inspected 10 national standards and 21 industrial standards. 11 national standards and 16 industrial standards were for approval. 38 standards was established and 5 standards was published. In addition, CFIA finished the cleanup assessment for 15 mandatory standards and reviewed 258 recommended national standards.

To Improve Feed Industry Supporting Regulations

CFIA reviewed new feed, new feed additives, imported feed and feed additives legally and approved 1 product. Also CFIA evaluate 5 revision suggestions which is proposed by the companies about sunflower oil and so on to Feed Ingredients Catalog and 4 revision suggestions about sodium metabisulfite and so on to Feed Additives Breed Catalog. We keep to expand the application range of Feed Ingredients Catalog and Feed Additives Breed Catalog.

To Enhance Feed Industry Monitoring and Warning

According to National Feed Industry Statistic Reporting Institution, CFIA has implemented the industry monitoring and warning nationally and published situation analysis reports termly. CFIA can master the industry news timely from more than 260 statistic monitoring spots. We also held the feed situation analysis consultant meeting termly and published Chinese Feed Industry Yearbook and National Feed Industry Statistic Data to provide the reference for government scientific decision and company production.      

In 2016, the total nationwide commercial feed production is 20,918 million tonnes, with year-on-year growth of 4.5%, in which compound feed production is 18 395 million tonnes, increasing 5.7% year on year; Concentrated feed production is 1832 million tonnes, dropping 6.5% year on year; Additive premix feed production is 691 million tonnes, increasing 5.8% year on year.

The proportion of compound feed, concentrated feed and additive premix feed in overall production is 87.9%, 8.8%, 3.3% respectively. The compound feed proportion increased 1%, concentrated feed proportion decreased 1% and additive premix feed proportion is flat than the last year.

IFIF-table-style-China-2017-new

Total Quantity of Feed Production

In 1980, total feed production was 1.1 million tonnes, in 2005, total quantity increased to 107.32 million. In 2011, it reached 180.63 million. In 2014, total feed production increased to 197.27 million tonnes.

IFIF-table-style-China-20172-new

Feed Additives Production

From 2008 to 2014, amino acid, vitamin and minerals& clathrate increased respectively 452.4%, 72.3%, 227.8%; feed enzyme, antiseptic agent & preservatives and microorganism increased 174.2%, 1456.4%, 159.3%. Feed amino acid is sufficient for domestic use, with certain amount for export.

IFIF-table-style-China-20173-new

Mergers and Acquisition

There are more and more large-scale feed manufacturers appeared and feed industry concentration degree improved. In 2003, total number of feed producers were 13 874. In 2014, the total number of feed manufacturers decreased to 9 584, 30% less than that of 2003. In 2003, there were 67 manufacturers with production capacity of 100 thousand tonnes/year, while in 2014, there were 500 manufacturers with production capacity of 100 thousand tonnes/year. Now there are 31 feed enterprises with annual production capacity of 1 million tonnes.

The Development of Feed industry Has Promoted Development of Animal Husbandry

China has long history in raising domestic animals, it is now in the transitional period from traditional to modern animal husbandry.

Major Livestock Products Output

In 2013, total production of meat, egg and milk were respectively 85.35 million tonnes, 28.76 million tonnes and 35.31 million tonnes, with average per caput of meat, egg and milk was 62.9 kgs, 21.2 kgs and 26.1 kgs.

For more information please visit: www.chinafeed.org.cn.
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Europe

FEFAC

FEFAC, the European Compound Feed Manufacturers’ Federation, represents 24 national Associations in 23 EU Member States as well as Associations in Switzerland, Turkey, Norway, Serbia and Russia with observer/associate member status. The European Manufacturers of Feed Minerals Association (EMFEMA) as well as the European Former Foodstuffs Processors Associations (EFFPA) also hold associate membership. The European compound feed industry employs over 100,000 persons at approximately 3,500 production sites often in rural areas which offer few other employment opportunities.

Key Market Developments

The industrial compound feed production for farmed animals in the EU-28 in 2016 reached an estimated level of 155.4 mio. t, i.e. 0.4% more than in 2015, according to data provided by FEFAC members.

INDUSTRIAL COMPOUND FEED PRODUCTION PER COUNTRY 155 MIO. T IN 2016 IN THE EU-28

Source: The European Feed Manufacturers’ Federation (FEFAC)

As regards cattle feed, the picture is extremely contrasted throughout Europe. The Netherlands and Poland have seen their production of cattle feed increase by more than 8%, whereas France moved in the opposite direction, reflecting the diverging national milk production following the abolishment of dairy quotas. Overall, due to low milk prices, dairy farmers were not encouraged to purchase high performing feed to maximise milk production, resulting in a moderate increase in EU cattle feed production of 0.1%.

Despite the Avian Influenza outbreak at the end of 2016, that impacted several poultry producing regions of Europe, in particular France where a 4% decrease was recorded, the poultry feed production performed rather well in 2016, with a 2% increase. EU poultry feed production is still the leading segment of EU industrial compound feed production, well ahead of pig feed.

On the pig feed side, after two years of moderate growth, the production decreased by 1% in 2016. This can partly be explained by the effects of African Swine Fever in Eastern Europe, which weighed heavily on the development of pigmeat production, but also by low market prices for pigmeat in the first half of 2016 and large availability of feed grade cereals at low prices which benefitted on-farm mixing.

For the third year in a row, Poland was one of the best performing countries, with annual growth of +4.7%, boosted by the demand for poultry feed which has turned Poland into the largest poultry producing country in the EU. The Netherlands benefited from the sustained demand for dairy feed and recorded a 1% growth vs. 2015. Germany has seen its compound feed production remaining stable maintained its position as leading EU country in terms of total compound feed production, ahead of Spain and France, who recorded opposing trend with -3% in France and + 1.5% in Spain.

INDUSTRIAL COMPOUND FEED PRODUCTION PER COUNTRY 155 MIO. T IN 2016 IN THE EU-28

* OTHER NATIONS (DETAILED BREAKDOWN)
Source: The European Feed Manufacturers’ Federation (FEFAC)

A number of CAP (Common Agricultural Policy) & trade policy measures also impacted performance of the feed market in 2015: the entry into application of the new CAP, with the application of the greening measures which affected the supply of grains and oilseeds, but also the end of the milk quota system.

Key Regulatory & Policy Developments

Brexit

The Brexit referendum held in June 2016 was by far the most important political development in Europe. FEFAC has called on the UK and the EU-27 to ensure agricultural trade disruptions are avoided during the formal Brexit negotiations and “post” Brexit transition phase starting end of March 2019. Fully functioning and accessible agricultural markets are in the interest of livestock farmers, market partners and all European consumers. FEFAC members are convinced that a comprehensive free trade agreement between the UK and the EU-27, based on EU standards, would be the best outcome for both the EU and UK feed & livestock sector. A dedicated FEFAC Brexit Task Force will analyse potential trade impacts of the Brexit negotiations on the EU feed & livestock sector.

Antimicrobial resistance & Animal nutrition

Antimicrobial resistance continues to be a top priority for EU policy makers. FEFAC has proactively communicated the contribution of balanced animal nutrition as a component of a successful prevention strategy to reduce the need for medical treatment, such as antibiotics, in livestock production. This key role of animal nutrition was also recognised in the “RONAFA report” by EMA-EFSA (European Medicines Agency – European Food Safety Authority) issued in January 2017, whilst first pointing to adequate farm conditions related to housing and hygiene. In the new EU AMR Action Plan published on 29 June 2017, the European Commission highlighted the contribution of feeding regimes to support good animal health and welfare to help reduce the need for antibiotics at farm level. FEFAC hopes these recognitions are followed up at national level with the involvement of feed manufacturers in national action plans to help achieving AMR reduction as part of the “One-Health” approach. Part of the communication strategy is also to continuously remind people of the EU ban on the use of antibiotic growth promoters since 2006. A Eurobarometer study showed only 37% of Europeans are aware of it. FEFAC calls on EU authorities to make use of the farm advisers network to disseminate best practices on the farms and help farmers implementing them as a prerequisite to reap benefits from optimised animal nutrition. A key limiting factor to share this experience with farmers is the very narrow scope for feed manufacturers to communicate the contribution of feed to animal health via claims on labels The Code of Good Practice on labelling of compound feed, developed by FEFAC and Copa-Cogeca (EU organisation of farmers and their cooperatives), was officially endorsed by EU authorities in summer 2016 and provides useful guidance on how to word and justify claims, but also shows the limitation resulting from a Veterinary Medicine Law taking precedence over the feed law in Europe. On 20 June 2017, FEFAC organised an event with FEFANA (feed additives) and IFAH-Europe (veterinary medicine producers) aimed at livestock farmers to disseminate the innovative solutions the industry sectors have to offer and discuss the conditions for their implementation.

Use of former foodstuffs in feed to reduce food waste

The European Commission included the stimulation of the use of former foodstuffs in animal feed in their Circular Economy Package as one of the means to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal of reducing food waste (50% by 2030). Former foodstuffs are foodstuffs, other than catering reflux, which were manufactured for human consumption in full compliance with the EU food law but which are no longer intended for human consumption for practical or logistical reasons or due to problems of manufacturing or packaging defects or other defects and which do not present any health risks when used as feed. Examples are bread, biscuits, pasta, breakfast cereals and chocolates. It is estimated that approximately 3.5 million tonnes of former foodstuffs are used in animal feed in Europe. The EU looks to stimulate the use of former foodstuffs in feed by making the legal clarification that substances that are marketed as feed are excluded from waste legislation, meaning a reduction. In addition, the European Commission is developing Guidelines to clarify points of confusion, such as the suitability of former foodstuffs with an expired date marking or former foodstuffs collected from a food manufacturer’s factory floor.

Feed Safety Management

FEFAC is preparing the launch of an independent benchmarking system of existing feed safety assurance programmes, in cooperation with ITC (International Trade Centre). The expectation is that such as a tool could deliver recognition by national feed control authorities of national code of practices and assurance programmes developed by FEFAC members. It could also facilitate and accelerate ongoing mutual recognition procedures among feed safety assurance scheme owners. FEFAC will make use of the list of indicators developed in the framework of the IFIF – Feed Safety Observatory (FSO) project in cooperation with ITC. FEFAC will perform outreach activities vis-à-vis organisations of chain partners to present them this project and involve scheme owner at the earliest stage possible. The development fits the FEFAC 2030 Vision on Feed Safety Management, which aims to pave the way for a greater recognition by competent EU feed control authorities of the value of company auto-controls as foreseen in the new EU legislation on Official food and feed controls.

Environmental footprinting

The EU feed industry is conscious of its share and contribution to the environmental footprint of consumer goods produced with livestock farming. For several years now, FEFAC has been working on the establishment of an internationally harmonised methodology that can produce the lifecycle environmental performance of animal products in a transparent way. As part of the European Commission’s PEF (Product Environmental Footprint) project, FEFAC is part of the technical secretariat of the Feed pilot (as are the members AIC, NEVEDI, SNIA, DAKOFO, ASSALZOO, FHL), which is an essential element in determining the environmental performance of animal products like meat, milk and eggs. The PEF aims to set the foundation for a future single market of green products where environmental claims are based on the same principles and are comparable. Together with IFIF, FEFAC is involved in the GFLI (Global Feed LCA Database) which aims to a credible and transparent attempt at creating a publicly available environmental footprint assessment database and tool, supported on different continents. At the end of 2016, it became known that the GFLI was awarded a European Commission tender to deliver the database that will feed into the Feed PEF pilot. The expectation is that the European Commission will seek to finalise and approve the PEF feed category rules by the end of 2017.

Responsible Soy

European feed manufacturers interested in purchasing responsible soy are faced with many different schemes and programmes, though very similar in most aspects. The FEFAC Soy Sourcing Guidelines intend to increase market transparency and foster the mainstream supply of responsibly produced soy to Europe. The Guidelines consist of a set of minimum criteria on legal compliance, responsible working conditions, environmental responsibility, good agricultural practices, respect of land rights and the protection of community relations. Responsible soy scheme owners can benchmark their programme against the FEFAC Guidelines online, allowing feed manufacturers with the overview of which available programmes meet the feed industry’s minimum requirements. As of May 2017, 16 responsible soy progammes have been positively benchmarked by the International Trade Center (a WTO subsidiary), showing the strong uptake and interest of responsible soy scheme owners to be recognised by the EU feed industry. The involvement of soy farmer groups in the discussion of responsible soy production has proved to be of great importance and will be essential to achieve FEFAC’s goal of realising a mainstream market transition. To further stimulate the production and trade of responsible soy of Brazilian origin, FEFAC signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Brazilian partners APROSOJA (soy farmers) and ABIOVE (oilseed crushers) as well as the European partners FEDIOL (oilseed crushers) and IDH (The Sustainable Trade Initiative) in January 2017. A primary goal is guiding the soy farmer good agricultural practice programme Soja Plus towards benchmarking against the FEFAC Soy Sourcing Guidelines.

EU Protein balance sheet

In April 2017, the European Commission for the first time published a comprehensive EU protein balance sheet. The overview shows the total EU production, consumption and trade of all marketable sources of proteins used in animal feed production. Next to well-defined sources of protein-rich materials such as soybean meal, rapeseed meal and pulses, the balance sheet includes sources with lower protein content like cereals. The balance sheet shows the total protein needs in the EU, with EU production of cereals and oilseeds (i.e. derived rapeseed and sunflower meal through domestic crushing) providing the bulk of raw protein requirements. It also confirms the strong need to import protein-rich sources such as soybean meal and soybeans for EU crushing. FEFAC welcomed the Commission efforts to develop a dedicated, independent tool to monitor the balance of demand and availability of protein crops in the EU, which will contribute to market transparency and help operators to better understand market developments. This allows for informed discussions and an assessment of potential changes to the agricultural sector and the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), non-agricultural uses like biofuels, phytosanitary and trade and anti-dumping policies which could affect the availability of protein sources for EU livestock farmers as well as increase dependency on imports. Assured and predictable access to a strategic supply of proteins to meet demand and to feed farm animals is crucial for the competitiveness and resilience of the EU feed and livestock sector. The first updated version covering data for the 2016/2017 Marketing year will contribute to the discussions within the scope of the European cereals, oilseeds and protein crops market observatory, of which FEFAC is a member.

COMPOUND FEED PRODUCTION IN EUROPEAN PRODUCTION (INDEX 100 = 1995)

Source: FEFAC – Alltech – Feed International
For more information please visit: www.fefac.eu.
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Europe

FEFANA

FEFANA is the EU Association of Specialty Feed Ingredients and their Mixtures. It acts as the united voice of the specialty feed ingredients business in Europe. Its membership comprises manufacturers and traders of feed additives, functional feed ingredients, premixes and other mixtures of specialty ingredients that enter the food chain via feed. FEFANA facilitates the dialogue between EU institutions and feed business operators while promoting feed and food safety and a fair and competitive market.

FEFANA’s overall mission is to promote, safeguard and defend the common and general interests of the industry of SFIs and their Mixtures. It represents the views of its Members to the EU authorities and, via its network of national partners in key EU Member States, also to the Competent Authorities of these countries. FEFANA has gained a strong positive reputation across Europe to key decision-makers and it has built close contact with other stakeholders of the feed and food chain.

FEFANA is a well-recognized IFIF full member. Representing the supplying industry, FEFANA plays a significant role in the feed & food chain and shares a common responsibility with the compound feed industry. FEFANA views IFIF as the interface to certain key international organisations, such as FAO, Codex, OIE and ISO, and the ideal platform to meet with other actors of the feed and food chain.

FEFANA-IFIF SFIS project

Building on the completed phase of the Specialty Feed Ingredients Sustainability (SFIS) Project, designed to measure and establish the role of Specialty Feed Ingredients on the environmental impact of livestock production using amino acids and phytase as pilots, FEFANA and IFIF have established a consortium to undertake further work with regard to other innovative specialty feed ingredients in 2016.

Due to their functionality, Specialty Feed Ingredients are recognised to have not only the potential to improve animal performance, but also to reduce the environmental impact of livestock production and the consumption of resources. The current Phase-3 of the FEFANA/SFIS project aims at validating and further developing the Product Category Rules (PCR) that was established for amino acids and phytase for other specialty feed ingredients. The list of products includes:

  • NSP enzymes (focus on xylanase and glucanase mixtures)
  • Phytogenic, including application of mixtures
  • Organic acids (for zootechnical impact)
  • Protease
  • Probiotics

The project plan sets system boundaries (animal production cradle to farm gate), animal categories (swine and chicken), functional unit (Production of 1 kg of animal product: meat, eggs, etc.), time and regional limitation (EU, US, South America, Asia), as well as standard methodology (LCA assessments according to the specific recommendations of the internationally recognised standard of ISO 14040:2006).

By setting up a standard approach to measure and by delivering a manual of nutritional practice, the project enables Specialty Feed Ingredients to be included in the evaluation of the mitigation measures to reduce the environmental impact of animal production on a global basis. Amongst the impacts to be demonstrated are reduction of the global warming potential, as well as eutrophication and acidification potential. The outcome of the project will broaden the ecological database for SFIs which is rather important for future sustainability discussions end environmental mitigation options along the feed and food value chain.

International Cooperation for Convergence of Technical Requirements for the Assessment of Feed Ingredients (ICCF)

Based on the IFIF “Comparison of Regulatory Management of Authorized Ingredients, Approval Processes, and Risk-Assessment Procedures for Feed Ingredients” report which covered synergies and gaps for product approvals in Brazil, Canada, China, EU, Japan, South Africa and USA, regulatory authorities and feed and feed ingredient associations from Canada, the European Union and the United States met in Brussels in May 2017 to launch the International Cooperation for Convergence of Technical Requirements for the Assessment of Feed Ingredients (ICCF). This important international cooperation aims to develop and establish common guidance that covers technical requirements for the assessment of new feed ingredients, including new uses of existing feed ingredients.

Founding ICCF members include the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the European Commission (DG SANTE), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as well as the American Feed Industry Association (AFIA), the Animal Nutrition Association of Canada (ANAC), the EU Association of Specialty Feed Ingredients and their Mixtures (FEFANA) and the International Feed Industry Federation (IFIF).

The ICCF is the result of a concerted effort to bring together feed regulators and industry feed associations to work together to develop common guidance documents for technical requirements needed in the assessment of feed ingredients. This will benefit not only the three regions covered, as the guidance documents will be made available for reference and use by other jurisdictions around the globe. The initiative will help to facilitate free and fair trade of feed ingredients as well as support the feed and food chain as it works to safely and sustainably meet the global growing demand for animal protein.

FEFANA consortia for the authorization of feed additives in the EU

Through an efficient cooperation system, manufacturers and importers of feed additives were offered the opportunity to participate in FEFANA Consortia and jointly prepare and submit applications for the re-authorisation of over 1000 additives. These are being evaluated by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) prior to re‐authorisation by the European Commission. The evaluation phase of some Consortia dossiers is still on-going and its completion might take a few more years.

A major milestone was achieved in early 2017 with the publication of a first set of authorisations of feed flavourings compounds including more than 150 compounds pertaining to 15 dossiers of Chemically Defined Substances. The conditions of use of these re-authorisations are significantly different from their previous authorised use as per Directive 70/524/EEC. Whereas the previous authorisation did not provide limits for level of inclusion of the great majority of flavourings in feed, the new authorisations have in their majority a recommended use level for all species and few of them have also a maximum permitted level. Such levels are recommended on the basis of the safety assessments performed by EFSA. The finalisation of the EFSA evaluation and subsequent EU re-authorization of all botanical feed flavourings is still pending.

FEFANA is committed not only in the daily management of the dossiers, but also on the practical implications that each re-authorisation may carry.

FEFANA Booklets

Being the technical expert on Specialty Feed Ingredients and their Mixtures, FEFANA aims at providing technical and scientifically sound information on the benefits and safety of the products of its industry. Over the last two years FEFANA has published five booklets on different categories of products: Premixtures, Organic Acids, Carotenoids, Amino Acids, and Vitamins. These and other publications are available on FEFANA Virtual Library at: http://fefana.org/virtual-library.html

FEFANA On-line classification tools guiding the industry on EU regulatory requirements

The distinction between feed materials and feed additives has critical implications for the placing of these products on the EU market. Feed business operators and competent control authorities are frequently faced with questions regarding the classification of products. EU guidelines for the distinction between feed materials, feed additives, biocidal products and veterinary medicinal products (EC Recommendation 2011/25/EU of 14th January 2011) were established to avoid inconsistencies and to provide an appropriate level of legal certainty, misclassification having potentially severe consequences. Since the guidelines remain somewhat theoretical, a need for such a useful tool was perceived by the operators. The FEFANA on-line tool does not aim to substitute for the operators’ or the authorities’ responsibility to take a decision but is expected to be an important benchmark in the decision process: http://fefana.org/ClassTool/

FEFANA has recently launched another user-friendly tool to support business operators in the categorization of the different types of mixtures as defined in the EU’s regulatory framework. The new tool is based on the definitions covered by the three reference EU Regulations for mixtures:

  • Regulation (EC) No 1831/2003 on additives for use in animal nutrition (premixtures);
  • Regulation (EC) No 767/2009 on the placing on the market and use of feed (compound feed);
  • Regulation (EC) No 327/2015 on the requirements for the placing on the market and conditions of use of additives consisting of preparations (feed additive preparations).

This voluntary tool, alongside the one launched earlier on for the identification of single substances, will continue facilitating businesses and authorities in their efforts to ensure compliance with the relevant regulatory requirements in the EU:

http://www.fefana.com/MixtureClassificationTool/

For more information please visit: www.fefana.org or contact us by e-mail at: info@fefana.org
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India

CLFMA

The Compound Livestock Feed Manufacturers Association was formed in 1967 with the objective of helping the promotion of overall animal husbandry, including promotion of concept of balanced feeding of animals in accordance with their nutritional requirements for deriving from them maximum output through productivity improvement. Presently, we have around 240 Companies, comprising of Feed Manufacturers, Poultry & Dairy Operators, Animal Health and Nutrition companies as our Members.

CLFMA OF INDIA was broad based from the year 2002, to accommodate all the sectors of the Livestock Industry. All feed manufacturers including Non-Feed in Private, Government and Co-Operative Sectors, the Feed Additives / Feed Supplements Manufacturers and Suppliers.  Animal Health products, Manufacturers’ and Suppliers and Importers located all over the country as well as some of the MNC companies as well are our members.

CLFMA OF INDIA is recognized by Livestock farmers, Central and State Governments, Government Departments, Agricultural Universities, Veterinary Colleges and National Research Institutes in the Country as well as by related Sectors outside the Country. CLFMA’s views are solicited and considered as well by the Central and State Governments while formulating policies governing not only animal feed industry but also the entire gamut of animal production. “CLFMA AWARDS” are well respected in the industry.

Indian feed industry: Driven by growth in demand for animal protein and dairy products, compound feed production is on the rise in India.

The feed industry is growing at a CAGR of 8 -10%, with poultry, cattle and aqua feed sectors emerging as major growth drivers. The demand of animal protein and dairy products in India will increase the compound feed consumption volumes to 28 million tonnes by 2017/18.

The feed consumption in this segment has been growing at the rate of 7% to 8% over the last five years.

Livestock plays an important role in Indian economy. About 20.5 million people depend upon livestock for their livelihood. Livestock contributed 16% to the income of small farm households as against an average of 14% for all rural households. It also provides employment to about 8.8 % of the population in India. India has vast livestock resources. Livestock sector contributes 4.11% GDP and 25.6% of total Agriculture GDP.

India is:

  • First in the total buffalo population in the world
  • Second in the population of cattle and goats
  • Third in the population of sheep (72 millions)
  • Fifth in in the population of ducks and chicken
  • Tenth in camel population in the world.

Source: GOI, 2014

INDIAN AGRI GDP VS. LIVESTOCK GDP (IN USD BILLIONS)

Source: MOSPI, NAS 2015 USD/INR=65

Livestock production performance has been more impressive than that of food grain production. Milk, egg, meat, and fish showed impressive growth rates of 5 to 10%.The minimum targeted growth rate for attaining self sufficiency in milk, fish, meat and egg by 2001 AD are 5.54, 6.25, and 5.54% per annum respectively.

Livestock represents the only way in which the natural vegetation that covers large parts of India can be converted in to products that can be used by man. It provides drought power and manure to the crop enterprise and this in turn provides feed and fodder.

Doubling Farmers Income

A committee formed by the Centre to double farmers’ income by 2022, is considering major reforms in agriculture sector, like adopting a profit-centric approach and to aim at increased productivity and reduced cost of cultivation.

The inter-ministerial panel, constituted in April last year, is also looking at suggesting market reforms in a big way and increasing focus on sub-sectors of agriculture like animal husbandry, poultry and fisheries. The committee has been holding consultations with different stakeholders, including ICAR scientists, farmers and professional bodies, and it would submit its report by April this year.

Noting that majority of farmers in the country are small and marginal, making farming viable is the “biggest challenge”. The principle of profit generation in agriculture comes from looking at what is the gross output and what is the cost of cultivation. “Gross output which has been the approach so far has been to increase production at any cost. But we would like to increase production on a sustainable basis such that resources are not compromised, in all crops, all commodities and all sub sectors of agriculture. So, the gross output in terms of value to farmer,”

The post-harvest management, involving how the commodity is stored, transported and marketed assumes enormous importance. Another important thing being examined by the committee is the role of important drivers of growth like animal husbandry, poultry, fisheries and horticulture.

“Considering that consumption patterns are changing today and Livestock industry is growing at CAGR of 8-10%, people are now going for high value crops like meat, milk and eggs . It has to be a market-led demand-driven approach to the livestock industry products. The livestock industry products exactly fall under the Prime Minister mission of “doubling farmers’ income by 2022”.

Agriculture has reached the saturation and the growth is very slow.  However, the allied industry like dairy, poultry, fisheries, pigs, sheep and goat, etc. are growing at 6-10%.  More focus on livestock industry and animal husbandry will go a long way to achieve our aim of doubling farmers’ income.

Hence, our theme for the Golden Jubilee Celebration is: “The Role of Animal Agriculture in Doubling the Farmers’ Income.”

For more information please visit: http://www.clfmaofindia.org/
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Iran

IFIA

IFIA, based in Tehran, is the Iran`s largest organization devoted exclusively to representing the business, legislative and regulatory interests of the Iran animal feed industry and its suppliers. Founded in 2013, IFIA also is the recognized leader for international companies and provincial associations.

Members include 644 certified mills including: livestock feed and Additive feed manufacturers, integrators, pharmaceutical companies, ingredient suppliers, equipment manufacturers and companies which supply other products, services and suppliers to feed manufacturers. The feed industry makes a major contribution to feed safety, nutrition and the environment, and it plays a critical role in the production of healthy, wholesome meat, milk, fish and eggs.

An overview of Iran’s feed industry history

Iran`s Feed industry has started working more than 60 years ago at the same time with the industrialization of animal husbandry. Now a day, despite the high depreciation, 3 generations of technology are working in the feed mills.

The growth of this industry in the past decade has been significant due to a free and competitive atmosphere for investment. The number of animal feed mills was 300 units in 2002 with a capacity of about 8 million tons production yearly, while the number of mills receives to 645 units after 15 years with a production capacity of 20 million tones.

Further, during these years the majority of the new units have been established with a production capacity of over 30 thousand tons, with consideration of high efficiency as well as having two working shifts. Above all, unlike the old units, the new units operate with higher capacity or near to their actual capacity.

Also, the technology used in these units is completely up to date; also they have all of the GMP certification and new standards of the country`s authorities. Most of livestock, poultry and aquatic breeding units prefer to refer to new established feed mills for preparation their required feed.

With this perspective and optimistically, until the end of 2031 (14 years later) about 200 production units with capacity of 7 million tons, will added to current units. Future mills with possessing modern technology and high productivity, will replace the old and disabled mills. Obviously, in parallel, related industries with livestock and poultry feed will be developed equally, as well.

In other words we can say:

  • Construction of first feed mill was in 1953
  • 54 years ago we had: 1 unit
  • Over the last 41 years: 6 units
  • Over the last 35 years: 10 units
  • Over the last 30 years: 19 units
  • In the recent 34 years: 626 units

In the case of the provision of liquidity, improvement of protein products market, reduction of feed manufacturing in the farms as well as growth of the competitiveness, obviously, the domestic and foreign investors will have more interest to enter this industry and its perspective would be better and brighter.

The most significant Actions of IFIA in 2016

  • A total of 54 missions including sending Iranian trade delegates to abroad and the reception of trade delegations in 2016 from Germany, Italy, French, Austria, Belgium, China, India, Iraq, CIS countries and Australia, indicatives the efforts of IFIA for expanding trade negotiations in the field of crops, investment in the production of animal feed, Joint Venture, feed additive, technology and machinery of feed mills.
  • One of the most significant IFIA`s plan for 2016 was Joint Venture and Co-production in Iran regarding Iran appropriate market with the population of 80 million or rather, a 400 million population – market considering the neighbors countries.
  • Further IFIA is going to have cooperation directly with Agricultural sector of EU commission.

Examples of IFIA cooperation with government agencies, such as Iran veterinary organizations and Iranian national standards organization in 2016:

  • Codification of Article 34 of the law regulations of Iran’s sixth five-year plan of economic development (2017-2021) for the production, storage, distribution, transport and supply of animal feed
  • The establishment of health systems and safety assurance like GMP, HAACP, ISO 22000 in feed mills (legal obligations of Iran veterinary organizations, section S, Article 7)
  • Signing the Memorandum with the No. 43257/50/95 between IFIA and Iran Veterinary Organization. According to this MOU, all health and production laws, regulations and monitoring must be done in partnership with IFIA. (For reading the objectives of the MOU please click on the following link: http://irfia.ir/shfolder/news20.htm.
  • Updating animal feed and inputs standards, with participation of Iranian national standards organization, the Ministry of Agriculture-Jihad and Inspection companies related to Reference laboratories. Also, the update process is continuously being pursued.
  • Reviewing and developing the necessary standards and regulations for free antibiotics, Organic and HALAL feed production in partnership with Iran Veterinary Organizations and Iran National Standards Organization.
  • By IFIA`s tracking and regarding investigating the implementation of Regulations, an instruction was sent to the Veterinary departments of all Iran provinces with themed “Prohibition of the animal feed production in livestock and poultry farms”. (Currently about 60 to 70 percent of feed are manufacturing in farms)
  • Consultations conducted by IFIA and Iran Parliament, It was determined a rate of 8 percent increasing in the amount of bank loans and bank credit line to feed mills.
  • In consultations with Customs Organization, Trade Promotion Organization of Iran and the Ministry of Agriculture Jihad, the customs duty for animal feed exports was removed. And in the next phase, exports of animal feed was released (over a three-year process from 2014 to 2016)
  • The plan for establishment of a national fund to support the animal feed mills with initial capital of $ 25 million (including 49% state share and 51%private sector share). This plan was approved by the government cabinet through a process of two years.
  • Tangible and significant reduction of import tariffs for inputs, animal compound feed, feed additives and animal feed supplements.

State of Compound Feed production in 2016

  • In 2016, 645 feed mills are manufacturing 8,800 thousand tons of animal feed. They totally produced 5,040 thousand tons cattle feed, 3,600 thousand tons poultry feed.
  • Statistics shows that Industrial feed production in Iran increased about 60 percent during 5 years from 2011 to 2016.
  • Worth the investment is over $ 12 billion.
  • Also feed production has 7 percent growth comparing 2015.

Iran-data-2017

Consumption of Feed Ingredients in 2016

According official statistics of Agriculture-Jihad Ministry, total amount of Feed ingredients consumption in 2016 was 72,861 thousand tons including HAY (73.6%) such as Alfalfa, corn silage, straw,… and Concentrate (26.4%) like corn, soybean meals, barley,…

Livestock Feed Export in 2015

In 2015 Iran exported about 130,000 tons different livestock products such as compound feed, concentrate, premix, additives and supplement with the value of $ 68 million to other countries.

Meanwhile, the volume of export in 2011 was about 26000 tons. Iran Feed Industry Association intends to reach to 900,000 tons livestock export in the next 5 years (2021).

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Japan

JFMA

The Japan Feed Manufacturers Association (JFMA) was established in 1957 as a cooperative to contribute to the prosperity of Japanese feed and livestock industry.

JFMA has 47 member companies and 73 feed mills as of 01 May 2017,  which produce formula and mixed feed in Japan. JFMA’s total feed production by member companies is approx. 15.7 million tons (0.2% increase from the previous fiscal year).

Japan has been relying on imports for most of feed grains such as corn, sorghum, barley, wheat totaling 11,722 thousand tons a fiscal year (decreased by 2.4%) of which most are imported from United States but now imports from diversified countries, Ukraine, Brazil and Argentina due to the improvement of their inland transportation and also the port facilities.

Japan used to import corn, which accounts for about 46% of formula and mixed feed and second largest is Soybean Meal (12.3%), the third one is the rice for feed (5.2%) which is increased rapidly.

At the end of 2013, the Japanese government released a new agricultural policy and tries to expand rice for feed production to 1.1 million tons in 2025.

It is an important goal to secure reasonable domestic feed ingredients and stable supply for Japanese feed and livestock industries, which are not affected by international market nor abnormal weather condition.

Japanese total formula and mixed feed production in 2016 was 23,627 million tons (increased by 0.4%) which was caused due to decline of number of dairy farms 17.0 thousand (decreased by 4.0%), number of heads for dairy cows 1,345 thousand (decreased by 1.9%). Number of beef cattle farms was 51.9 thousand (decreased by 4.6%), number of heads was 2,479 thousand (decreased by 0.4%). Number of pig farms was 4.8 thousand (decreased by 8.3%). Number of pigs was 9,313 thousand (decreased by 2.3%). Feeding number of poultry was dropped by 0.8% in 2016 and feeding wings decreased by 1.0%.

PRODUCTION OF FEED IN JAPAN IN 2016 (1000 TONNES)

Source: MAFF (Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries)

For more information please visit: www.jafma.or.jp.
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Latin American & Caribbean

FEEDLATINA

FEEDLATINA, the Latin American and Caribbean Feed Industries Association, is based in Uruguay and aims to be the main voice of information, preparation, performance and credibility of the feed sector vis-à-vis public and private actors at all levels.

The Association seeks to strengthen the image of Latin America to the consumers, and enable developing countries to join forces and strengthen their representation.

FEEDLATINA works to promote increased dialogue between the feed industry and regulatory agencies and is based on a further sharing of responsibilities between them in order to promote compliance with technical and commercial regulations (“co-regulation”). FEEDLATINA works to support a robust, integrated and strong Latin America.

Our members include:

AUDINA, CAENA, CAPENA, CONAFAB, SINDIRAÇÕES, UECAN, ADISSEO, AJINOMOTO, ALLTECH, APC, BASF, BIOFARMA, CARGILL, DSM, DUPONT, EVONIK, IMPEXTRACO, MARS, MCASSAB, NOVUS, POLI NUTRI, QUIMTIA.

FEEDLATINA works to promote increased dialogue between the feed industry and regulatory agencies and is based on a further sharing of responsibilities between them in order to promote compliance with technical and commercial regulations (“co-regulation”). FEEDLATINA works to support a robust, integrated and strong Latin America.

STDF/PG/345: Feed and Food Security Program

As one of our key priorities, FEEDLATINA is implementing its STDF/PG/345: Feed and Food Security Program – A project for regulatory harmonization and feed safety in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The STDF/PG/345 program is supported by the Standards and Trade Development Facility (STDF) a global partnership that supports developing countries in building their capacity to implement international sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) standards, guidelines and recommendations as a means to improve their human, animal, and plant health status and ability to gain or maintain access to markets.

Started in 2013, STDF/PG/345 also has support from FAO office in Latin America, the OIE Americas, the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA), Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay in addition to the feed industries and national associations.

The Project is indented to contribute to the harmonization/equivalence of the regulatory framework for the production and commercialization of animal feed, ensuring its safety and access to markets, based on the relevant international organizations, through public-private cooperation, using a value chain approach, boosting regional integration and facilitating trade within Latin American countries.

Harmonized regulations will contribute to strengthening public and private institutions on production and good animal feeding practices, through the development of national coordination mechanisms between the industry and regulatory authorities.

The multi stakeholder project has three components:

1. Coordination mechanisms and coordination between public and private actors linked to the animal feed sector

2. Development of tools to promote harmonization of standards and equivalence of measures

3. Capacity building (feed industry and government agencies).

Harmonized regulations will contribute to strengthening public and private institutions on production and good animal feeding practices, through the development of national coordination mechanisms between the industry and regulatory authorities.

Specific instruments/tools to harmonize and strengthen the current regulatory frameworks for animal feed will be developed, based on the regulatory frameworks of some of the participating countries. Technical capacity at the industry and regulatory levels will be enhanced in the region through training on Regulatory Affairs, Good Manufacturing Practices, HACCP and other related topics.

The project also promotes public-private collaboration as it is based on the development of coordination mechanisms and the sharing of responsibilities between the feed industry and the regulatory authorities in order to promote compliance with technical and commercial regulations, increase intra and inter-regional trade and foster regional integration.

Feed Statistics

FEED PRODUCTION IN LATIN AMERICA 2009-2015 [1.000T]

FEEDLATINA estimates – in absense of official/association source. The estimates were based on information from producers of the respective countries, FAOSTAT and Feedlatina companies operating in the Latin American market.

FEEDLATINA – BREAKDOWN OF FINISHED FEED PRODUCTION 2015 BY CATEGORY

FEEDLATINA estimates – in absense of official/association source. The estimates were based on information from producers of the respective countries, FAOSTAT and Feedlatina companies operating in the Latin American market.

IFIF-tables-Feedlatina2-2017
IFIF-tables-Feedlatina3-2017
IFIF-tables-Feedlatina4-2017
For more information please visit: www.feedlatina.org.
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New Zealand

NZFMA

The New Zealand Feed Manufacturers Association (NZFMA) represents the interests of almost all the animal feed manufacturing companies in New Zealand. Manufacturers and blenders of compound feeds, premixes and dietary supplements are amongst our member companies. The majority of feed is produced for the intensive livestock industries (poultry and pig), however feed is also produced for the ruminant and equine industries. A small amount of feed is also produced for animals such as dogs, emus, rabbits and fish.

Activities 2016/17

NZFMA has conducted a revision of training qualifications for the 2017 year for feed company employees to obtain the NZFMA Certificate of Stock Feed Manufacture, and has a continuing commitment to encourage companies and trainees to participate.

We are raising the profile of FeedSafeNZ accreditation and have reviewed the scheme. Blenders, as well as Compound members, have been invited to become accredited.

We have been organising industry seminars of interest to our members around the country.

Feed Statistics

These statistics report total tonnage of manufactured animal feed and total tonnage of raw materials used in feed production. This report does not include blended feed. These statistics now include the breakdown of species specific data for feed production. This breakdown had been excluded in previous publications between 2010 to 2012. Please note all figures reported in the tables below in this Executive Summary are in metric tonnes (unless otherwise specified).

IFIF-table-New-zealand-2017

IFIF-table-New-zealand-2017-3
IFIF-table-New-zealand-2017-4
For more information please visit: www.nzfma.org.nz.

 

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South Africa

AFMA

The Animal Feed Manufacturers Association (AFMA) of South Africa is the official representative body of the formal South African feed industry in the livestock feeds sector and larger agricultural environment.

AFMA acts on behalf of its members and represents the formal animal feed industry on various platforms and committees by enhancing, protecting and ensuring the current and future interests of its members and industry. This includes liaison and engagements on all levels, i.e. liaising, workshopping, debating and lobbying with the following interest groups:

  • Regulatory & Government
  • Academia
  • Food Value Chain
  • Grain Value chain
  • Industry participants

In this process, attention is focused upon the:

  • Feed regulatory environment
  • Industry Self-Regulation
  • Research and technical environment
  • Management Information
  • Training & Skills Development
  • Commodity trade environment
  • Industry and member communication

IFIF-table-South-africa-2017

General Market Conditions

The 2015/16 period has been one of the most challenging years in South African agriculture history, experiencing a 2-3 spell of drought reaching its climax in 2015/16. To add to the drought situation encountered, the SA feed industry had to manage external variables impacting on the business environment of which the most challenging is the volatile exchange rate and the impact of dumped poultry into the South African market.

Against this background, South Africa became a net importer of Summer Grains and Oilseeds in 2015/16, placing South Africa in a Grains and Oilseed trade deficit.

SOUTH AFRICAN MAIZE PRODUCTION (TONNES)

Source: Sourth Africa AFMA

SOUTH AFRICAN SOY, SUNFLOWER & SORGHUM PRODUCTION (TONNES)

Source: Sourth Africa AFMA

SOUTH AFRICAN IMPORTS OF SOY, SUNFLOWER & SORGHUM (TONNES)

Source: Sourth Africa AFMA

SOUTH AFRICAN MAIZE TRADE (TONNES)

Source: Sourth Africa AFMA

Furthermore in terms of Maize trade, it is important to note that South Africa has reached GMO synchronisation status with the USA during 2015/16, with regards to GMO Maize events for Commodity Trade, which opened-up Maize trade from the USA to South Africa. This achievement was specifically made possible through years of negotiations and cooperation between the SA Department of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries, AFMA, SACOTA and International Seed companies.

Despite the effects of the severe drought and external variables experienced, the demand for feed ingredients for animal feeds remained firm to adhere to the market demand for proteins (milk, meat and eggs).

AFMA FEED RAW MATERIAL USE (TONNE)

Source: South Africa AFMA

South Africa’s Grain Trade

(US$ / Rand Exchange Rate, 2014 – US$ 1 = R10.86; 2015 – US$1 = R12.77)

South Africa’s cereal exports dropped from US$ 801 million in 2014 to US$ 368 million in 2015. The large decline in cereal exports came on the back of the drought that had seen maize production fall by 27%. The largest fall in cereal exports was in maize, which decreased from US$ 451 million in 2014 to US$ 157 million in 2015.

Maize seed exports fell from US$ 147 million in 2014 to US$ 49 million in 2015. In the 2016/17 marketing season, production was predicted to fall by another 30%, supported by projections that South Africa would require 3.2 million tons of yellow maize and 1 million tons of white maize as a result of the drought.

South Africa’s Oilseed Trade

Overall, South Africa’s soybean and sunflower seed and oilcake imports during 2014 to 2015 remained stable at the same levels. The two oilseeds constituted 57% of the value of the country’s total oilseed imports in 2015. Soybean and sunflower seed production in the 2015/16 season is estimated at 750 250 tons and 742 750 tons, respectively. Soybean production fell from an all-time high of above 1 million tons in the 2014/15 season, whereas the sunflower seed crop grew 12% in the 2015/16 season due to a 25% increase in hectares planted.

South Africa’s dual soybean and sunflower seed crushing capacity is estimated at 2.5 million tons. However, the country’s maximum soybean crushing capacity is estimated at 1.75 million tons. Soybean imports are expected to increase in the 2016/17 season due to a decline in production on the one hand, while sunflower seed imports are expected to continue to decline owing to higher levels of production, on the other.

South Africa’s Animal Feed and Raw Materials

The value of imported animal feed products and related raw material declined from US$ 497 million in 2014 to US$ 321 million in 2015, while exports increased from US$ 249 million to US$ 235 million over the same period. Overall, the trade balance remained negative, but declined from US$ 258 million in 2014 to US$ 94 million in 2015.

Soya oilcake remained a major import component of animal feed raw materials, accounting for 55% of the tonnage (754 138 tons) in 2015. Argentina remains the primary source of Soybean meal for South Africa.

Sunflower oilcake makes up a relatively smaller share of total animal feed and raw material imports, accounting for 8% of volumes (188 536 tons) in 2015. Argentina is also the main source of sunflower oilcake for South Africa.

Association Activities — Feed Policy and Regulatory Environment

Animal Feed Forum (AFF)
AFMA meets with the Feed Regulator under Act 36 of 1947, (Directorate of Agricultural Inputs Control – AIC) – six times per year and in conjunction with other representatives from the Pet Food and Rendering industry sectors to discuss matters pertaining to the regulation and safe manufacturing of livestock feeds, pet food, raw materials and feed additives.

Facility registration for sterilising and rendering plants, as well as matters related to Inspection Services, is routinely discussed. The AFF continues to provide a valuable platform for industry and government to recognise concerns and also to work towards finding a solution together.

During the liaison meetings of the past year, significant focus was placed on the registration status of farm feeds due to the ever increasing backlog of registration applications and the resultant negative impact it has on trade in the feed industry. The confirmed capacity constraints within the Regulator, as well as a significant increase in the number of products to be registered, contributed to the growing backlog.

AFMA continued its participation in the Act 36 – Registration Working Group, which formed the basis of establishing an accurate progress report on the registration status of farm feeds. From these reports, the number of backlogged registration applications could be quantified and an action plan formulated for the Feed Registration Backlog Project (FRBP) that commenced in November 2015.

Feed Safety Forum (FSF)
The Feed Safety Forum provides direct liaison opportunities between the feed industry and the Directorate of Animal Health (AH) and Veterinary Public Health (VPH). Matters pertaining to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), traceability, blood meal use and the import of processed animal proteins are addressed on a regular basis by this forum. Due to the scheduling of the FSF on the same day as the AFF, interdepartmental discussions with industry can be accommodated.

In September 2016, the directors of Animal Health and AIC met with the feed industry to discuss the lack of a documented traceability system for processed animal proteins in South Africa, and the negative impact it has on the export of meat from South Africa. The blood meal procedure in terms of the traceability requirements [Veterinary Procedural Notice (VPN)] and the application process is being finalised.

AFMA’s involvement in the Blood Meal Working Group will ensure that the working group maintains pressure to implement it in 2016. This will enable feed manufacturers, which should meet the traceability and control measures as outlined in the VPN, to include blood meal in their monogastric formulations under controlled conditions.

Inspection Compliance Forum (ICF)
The Inspection Compliance Forum (ICF) convenes quarterly and provides feedback to industry via the participating member associations on general trends of noncompliance across all disciplines under AIC. The associations are AFMA, the Pet Food Industry Association (PFI), the Rendering and Sterilizing Association (RSA), Fertiliser Association of Southern Africa (FERTASA), the Association of Veterinary and Crop Associations of South Africa (AVCASA) and the South African Pest Control Association (SAPCA).

The illegal repackaging of farm feed, pet food and fertiliser, as well as the decanting of agricultural remedies into smaller containers, remains matters looked into. AIC’s Inspection Services have embarked on an awareness campaign to educate the rural consumer about the dangers and risks associated with these practices, and will launch public awareness sessions in conjunction with the municipalities in the targeted areas.

Furthermore, industry members of the ICF have been requested to assist with compiling a one-page awareness document that will be distributed at the public awareness sessions in the coming year.

Illegal imports of unregistered pesticides and other agricultural remedies have escalated during this reporting period and remain a concern. In addition, Inspection Services informed the ICF that the disposal of obsolete stock of agricultural remedies from farms is becoming a serious problem – this is partly due to the limited service providers available in South Africa, the cost involved and the lack of a sustainable action plan to remedy the situation in the long term. AVCASA will play an important role in trying to resolve this matter in the coming year.

AFMA Strategic Activities

AFMA Feed Registration Service (FRS)
The first phase of the Feed Registration Service as part of the AFMA strategy was launched on 1 July 2015. The value-added service is voluntary and available to all AFMA members at a minimal administration fee. The service was designed to address some of the major shortcomings and challenges already identified as primary contributors to the increasing backlog.

The partnership between industry and government, as emphasised by the FRS initiative, is endorsed by the Feed Regulator and supported by the Chief Director of the Directorate: Inspection and Quarantine services of the National Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF).

In response to the collaboration with the Feed Regulator, AFMA appointed an Administrator in March 2015 to facilitate the registration service. The Administrator has received extensive training on Act 36 of 1947 and has been working closely with the Registrar’s office throughout the year. The service aims to streamline the process towards a shorter registration approval time and offers a dedicated contact person at the AFMA office who will assist:

  • Receive and screen applications
  • Ensure that all required documents are included before submission
  • Confirm the correct registration fee to be paid
  • Submit the application/dossier in person to the Registrar’s office
  • Meet with a dedicated contact person from the Registrar’s office at least weekly to follow up
  • Communicate all requests from the Registrar regarding additional or outstanding information and clarification directly to the applicant
  • Actively pursue the most efficient assessment process for the dossier submitted
  • Personally collect the registration certificate upon completion, verify that it is correct and arrange for its collection by the applicant
  • Provide consistent information regarding fees, forms, supporting documents, etc.

A website was developed for the FRS to provide a dedicated platform where all relevant information on the service and Act 36 registration requirements can be hosted. For more information please visit www.afmafeedregistration.co.za.

During the reporting period, the FRS handled more than 780 applications, of which 95% have obtained registration certificates at the time of print. It became apparent that the progress and impact of the FRS was overshadowed by the huge amount of backlogged applications and that a strategic shift was required to prioritise the elimination of the backlog before the impact of the FRS could be measured meaningfully.

In view of the successful completion of the Feed Registration Backlog Project (FRBP) towards the end of the previous year, it is expected that the focus will return to optimising the value-added service to AFMA members in the year to come. Subsequent to the resignation of the Administrator, a new appointment was made in June 2016 and the service will continue for the coming year.

Feed Registration Backlog Project (FRBP)

On 4 September 2015, the AFMA Annual General Meeting (AGM) accepted the resolution by the Board of Directors to initiate a Feed Registration Backlog Project to be funded by AFMA. The project, to the value of ± US$ 100 000, was launched in October 2015. A tender request based on strict legal guidelines was issued and invited interested parties to provide sufficient and capable resources to access all outstanding new registration applications within a specified time limit. The tender was awarded to a consortium of experienced and specialised consultants, and the project kicked off on 9 November 2015.

The project team operated under the same conditions of accountability, integrity and confidentiality as the permanent technical advisory team of the Registrar and each application and its assessment records are fully traceable. The project was closely monitored by AFMA throughout all procedures, and regular meetings were scheduled to track the progress made and to resolve any issues that may have arisen from the operation of the project. The project team was based at the office of the Registrar to further improve project communication and outputs.

The FRBP consisted of 874 backlogged registration applications and covered not only livestock feeds, but the entire spectrum of raw materials (12%), feed additives (19%), livestock feed (25%) and pet food (44%). Collectively, the project team members spent just over 200 workdays (eight-hour days) on the project, even stretching across the December holidays.

The project concluded on 31 March 2016, with all 874 applications having been assessed and 469 registration certificates issued. The remaining 43% of applications were placed on hold, as they were still awaiting response from the registration holder.

By July 2016 the majority of the on-hold applications were concluded by Act 36 and the overall project outcome resulted in the finalisation and registration of 764 applications, while there were 62 rejections and 48 on-hold applications. The FRBP was undoubtedly a success – not only in accomplishing its goal in clearing the backlog, but also in providing valuable insight into the challenges faced by Act 36 and assisting in identifying areas for improvement. A thorough wrap-up session was held by the project team, AFMA and the Act 36 assessment team, where the lessons learnt were outlined and action plans were formulated to address the major concerns.

The biggest concern emanated from the fact that only 9% of all applications could be recommended for registration after the first round of assessment. This indicated a lack of skill and understanding by applicants to correctly complete registration applications, thus severely impacting the efficiency of the registration approval process. The matter was further complicated by the variety of application forms available and a number of ambiguous requests for information. To address this challenge, the Registration Working Group, in partnership with the consortium of consultants, developed a simplified and consolidated application form. A second outcome of the FRBP was to host a workshop to introduce the newly revised application form to the public and also to address some of the major lessons learned from the FRBP.

Feeds Bill

Progress on the Feeds Bill was slow during the previous year, since most of the time and resources relating to Act 36 was spent on the FRBP. The Feed Regulator has, however, met with the Red Meat Industry Forum (RMIF) and producer groups, as stakeholders of the proposed legislation, and an agreement was reached with regard to the inclusion of self-mixers in the Feeds Bill. The principal agreement is that self-mixers will be included in the legislation, which they will use registered products (ingredients) and that facilities that sell feed to third parties will apply for facility licensing.

Act 36 has also started preparing for the socio-economic impact assessment that needs to be conducted for any new legislation in South Africa. This is a new requirement that was not part of the previous effort to pass the Bill in Parliament in 2013. In July 2016, AFMA and the Pet Food Industry Association (PFI) met with the Registrar of Act 36 to discuss the Feeds Bill and action plan going forward.

A working group was formed with AIC, AFMA and the PFI and it is proposed that they provide initial comments on key elements of the draft bill by September 2016. Subsequently, AIC should engage in intergovernmental and public consultation towards the end of 2016. The working group will reconvene in the first quarter of 2017 to discuss and finalise the inputs received from the consultation sessions – the outcome of which is expected to be a draft Bill based on the principles and objectives to ensure safe feed for safe food and to be inclusive of all agricultural inputs to the food chain. AFMA will continue its active participation and support of this process throughout the next period.

Self-Regulation — AFMA Code of Conduct

During the period under review, the AFMA Code of Conduct has entered its eighth year of implementation, with most of the AFMA members having completed their third Code of Conduct compliance audit successfully.

AFMA aims to align its self-regulatory industry initiative with the regulatory requirements for facility audits by AIC Inspection Services and also with the Food Safety Initiative of the Consumer Goods Council of South Africa, thereby providing compliant members with a bigger scope and value-added audit. During the alignment process, the concept and particulars of the AFMA Feed Safety Scheme will be outlined in detail and requirements for additional auditing bodies to be appointed will be incorporated. It is a transparent process and stakeholders are continuously consulted along the way. The process is expected to be concluded by mid-2017.

Feed Miller Qualification

The learning material for the feed miller qualification has been finalised. The next phase is to implement a pilot project to evaluate the material in practice and to make adjustments where and if necessary.

AFMA has also reached an agreement with the University of Pretoria (UP) to deliver the qualification as a university certificate. AFMA will further engage in detailed discussions on this option with the university, including the registration of the qualification as a UP Programme with Higher Education.

AFMA Training Feed Mill

AFMA has reached an agreement with the University of Pretoria (UP) to establish a training feed mill at its experimental farm. The aim of this project has three objectives: the practical assessment of learners according to the feed miller qualification, feed processing research projects, and academic programmes for undergraduate and postgraduate students.

A memorandum of understanding between AFMA and UP in this regard has been drafted and will be submitted to UP for comment.

AFMA Feed Milling Short Course

AFMA, in association with NEFeed Milling Consulting, hosted its 5th feed milling short course from 30 May 2016 to 9 June 2016 in Johannesburg.

The course, with the largest number of delegates to date (40 delegates), hosted delegates from across the SADC region. A number of 28 delegates were from AFMA members based within the borders of South Africa, while two delegates represented Mauritius (Meaders Feeds) and two delegates represented Namibia (Feedmaster).

In addition, as part of the larger Southern Africa Feed Manufacturers’ Association (SAFMA) initiative driven by AFMA, the US Grains Council (USGC) sponsored a number of eight delegates from TAFMA to attend the course in South Africa Topics that were covered during the two-week course were as follows:

  • Aspiration systems
  • Batch mixing plant
  • Size reduction
  • Mixing
  • Liquid addition
  • Hygienising and compacting
  • Conditioning with steam
  • Expansion
  • Drying and cooling

 

Delegates attending the course gave the following feedback: “Impressive”, “Informative”, “Excellent”, “Learned something that can be implemented in practice”.

What is evident is that there is a real need in the industry for a course of this nature – the question was even raised why this course could not be presented on an annual basis. AFMA will therefore investigate hosting the course again in 2017, should there be sufficient interest from members.

TAFMA Training and Mentorship (Tanzanian Feed Manufacturer’s Association)

TAFMA was officially established on 30 January 1990 in Dar-es-Salaam to provide a common forum and platform for members and affiliated parties to discuss matters impacting on the direct business and business environment of the animal feed manufacturers of Tanzania.

In line with AFMA’s development of its regional initiative, the Southern Africa Feed Manufacturers’ Association (SAFMA), AFMA was approached by TAFMA for guidance and advice on the operation of a non-profit organisation (NPO) that would assist TAFMA in providing enhanced services to its members.

This business relationship was formally established after AFMA’s visit to Tanzania to attend the SADC Regional Poultry and Feeds Liaison Forum, where the SAFMA concept was presented and explained to TAFMA members. The event took place in Dar-es-Salaam from 3 to 6 December 2015. At a meeting held on 6 May 2016, it was agreed that representatives of TAFMA would visit South Africa for training and mentoring.

AFMA will provide training and mentorship in respect of the following:

  • Organisational structure
  • Establishment and functions of committees
  • Development of policies that are beneficial to the industry
  • Funding of the association
  • Improved communication with members
  • Creating industry standards and feed/food safety programmes to gain customer and consumer confidence
  • Lobbying government departments and other role players in the industry
  • Addressing regulatory matters on behalf of members
  • Collaborating on public relations messages to influence public opinion
  • Providing industry-specific training and skills development opportunities for members
  • Arranging industry workshops, conferences and forums for discussion and dialogue
  • Presenting networking opportunities for companies or individuals
  • Coordinating research projects
  • Supplying relevant information on input suppliers and service providers
  • Offering opportunities to put buyers and sellers in contact with each other
  • Mediating industry disputes with regard to procurement contracts
  • Assimilation of feed industry statistics

Through these efforts, AFMA will strive to assist TAFMA in providing much-needed value-added services to its members, increasing its membership base, enabling the feed industry in Tanzania to grow from strength to strength, and ultimately ensuring safe feeds resulting in safe food for Tanzanian consumers.

It is foreseen that this blueprint of a Feed Association’s principal functions and objectives can further be implemented by other feed associations in Southern Africa to support the establishment of a regional feed and feed-related association, SAFMA, which has the feed value chain principle in mind.

For more information please visit: www.afma.co.za.
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United States

AFIA

The American Feed Industry Association (AFIA), based outside Washington, D.C., USA, is the recognized leader on international feed industry issues and developments. Members include more than 650 domestic and international companies and state, regional and national associations. Member companies are livestock feed and pet food manufacturers, integrators, pharmaceutical companies, ingredient suppliers, equipment manufacturers and companies that supply other products, services and supplies to feed manufacturers.

The feed industry makes a significant contribution to food safety, nutrition and the environment, and plays a critical role in the economical production of healthy, wholesome meat, milk, fish and eggs. More than 75 percent of the commercial feed and 70 percent of the non-grain ingredients including soybean meal, distillers co-products, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, yeast products and other miscellaneous/specialty ingredients in the U.S. are manufactured by AFIA members.

AFIA is particularly proud of the Safe Feed/Safe Food Certification Program, an independent, third-party certified program that promotes accountability and leadership at feed facilities. To date, the Safe Feed/Safe Food program has more than 350 certified feed mills and feed-ingredient facilities in the U.S. and Canada.

A similar program, the International Safe Feed/Safe Food Certification Program—launched in 2010, when an alliance was formed with FEFANA, the Feed Additives and Premixtures Association of the European Union. FEFANA is the developer of the Feed Additives and Premixtures Quality Systems, or FAMI-QS, program. International Safe Feed/Safe Food is designed to help facilities’ trade with European customers by illustrating compliance with the EU’s Feed Hygiene Regulation (183/2005). There are more than 30 facilities with certification.

In addition, AFIA proudly offers two certifications that are benchmarked with the Global Food Safety Initiative—FSC32, Manufacturer of Pet Food and FSC34, Manufacturer of Animal Feeds. Both programs are administered by the Safe Quality Food Institute. The pet food program has more than 85 certified facilities from around the world—U.S., Canada, Brazil, China, Australia and Korea. The animal feed program has more than 30 certified facilities in the U.S., Canada, Australia, Mexico, Japan and Guatemala.

AFIA’s staff strives to provide members with the highest level of service and advocacy on a range of complex issues. While much of AFIA’s focus is on the federal government, which includes the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the association also works with agencies and legislatures in individual states.

AFIA tackled a variety of concerns on behalf of its members in 2016. The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), the ingredient approval process, trade-policy related items and the use of animal-health products in livestock and poultry are only a few of the issues the association addressed.

Outreach to FDA officials on a number of issues is a matter of consistent engagement for AFIA. The organization has continued to provide feedback on the FSMA and the use of antibiotics in feed as well as issues surrounding ingredient approvals.

On Nov. 8, 2016, Donald Trump was elected the 45th president, a surprise to many. One of President Trump’s campaign promises was to create quality manufacturing jobs by addressing excessive regulations and reducing corporate taxes for manufacturers. As a manufacturing industry, this creates optimism and opportunity for our members. However, President Trump’s position on international trade leaves us with much work ahead to maintain and grow the export markets that our industry also depends on.

US-Map-2017-new

A Preview of AFIA’s Key Issues in 2017

Food safety is and will continue to be a top priority for AFIA. This is demonstrated by the very positive safety record of the industry and the many steps that we continually take to enhance our food safety performance. AFIA supports FSMA and has worked closely with FDA in the development of the rules, as well as training the industry, to achieve its shared goal with the agency, which is a successful implementation.

However, there continue to be sections of the regulatory requirements under which our industry must operate that are quite costly to implement and do not contribute to further reduction of potential food safety hazards. AFIA is focused on achieving further improvements in the rules that will not affect food safety, but will make the rules more practical and less onerous and will lead to consistent implementation across the industry. We will also continue pursuing similar changes in portions of the Veterinary Feed Directive rule, as well as other regulations impacting the industry.

With the renewed recognition of the positive contributions manufacturing brings to our country, our Board of Directors will be taking action on recommended plans for working in partnership with the new administration, Congress and the various agencies to effectively “tell our story” and achieve these critical regulatory improvements.

In the case of international trade, we have a much higher hill to climb! In 2016, the U.S. exported $10.9 billion in animal food, animal food ingredients and pet food. In the last 20 years, animal food exports increased 168 percent. Much of this success is attributed to the tariff-free access the U.S. animal food industry receives from free trade agreements (FTAs).

The U.S. animal food industry continues to experiencing growing demand for animal protein in export markets. Trade grows animal food demand directly through exports of additional animal food and indirectly through exports of U.S. meat, milk and egg products. This is largely the result of new technologies and best practices, both of which also enhance the long-term sustainability of the U.S. animal food industry.

Much of the increased demand for animal protein is concentrated in the Asia-Pacific region. AFIA is working directly with China, other countries in this region and our government agencies to mutually open the doors for increased trade. With the U.S. withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), the U.S. animal food industry loses more than tariff reductions; it also loses the opportunity to implement much improved sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) terms which were agreed to by the participating countries. AFIA supports including these improved SPS terms as the U.S. now focuses on negotiation of new bilateral agreements.

Mexico and Canada are very important markets for the U.S. animal food industry, representing the U.S.’s largest and second largest export markets for feed, feed ingredients and pet food respectively. We look forward to participating in the process of reviewing and improving the very important NAFTA agreement with Canada and Mexico.

Ingredient Approvals—The backlog of new ingredients in the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approval process continues to grow as new technologies are being developed and submitted for approval. AFIA is working with FDA to identify roadblocks and define solutions to improve the time required for this process.

On a similar note, AFIA is enthusiastic about the International Cooperation for Convergence of Technology Requirements for the Assessment of Feed Ingredients (ICCF) which has recently been initiated by the jurisdictions of the U.S., Canada and European Union; in conjunction with Canadian and European feed industries, under the organizational umbrella of IFIF.

ICCF is following a similar model which has been successful in developing and adopting guidance which has enhance the global risk assessment and approval process for animal pharmaceuticals. AFIA and the U.S. animal food industry are committed to participating in, and look forward to the advances, which can be achieved through this newly developed process.

Feed Statistics

IFIF-tables-USA-2017-new

U.S. TOTAL FEED PRODUCTION IN 2015 BY ALL IN MILLIONS OF TONNES (182.68 MILLION TONNES TOTAL)

Source: FDA, USDA and AFIA
* Does not include dog and cat food

IFIF-tables-USA-2017-new2

For more information please visit: www.afia.org.

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IFIF MEMBERS

IFIF is made up of national and regional feed associations from Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, North and South America and the Middle East, as well feed related organizations and corporate members from around the globe.

IFIF members represent over 80% of total compound animal feed production worldwide.

National and Regional Associations

Corporate Members

Feed Related Organisations

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IFIF LEADERSHIP 2016 — 2017

Under its Articles of Association, held in Luxembourg, IFIF is managed by 
the Executive Director and overseen by 
an elected Chairman and Board of Directors drawn from the membership. Board Members serve two-year terms and are elected at the IFIF General Assembly.

IFIF Officers 2016 — 2017

  • IFIF Chairman: Joel G. Newman (AFIA)
  • IFIF Treasurer: Dr. Reinder Sijtsma  (Nutreco)
  • IFIF Regulatory Committee Chair: Dr. Karine Tanan (Cargill)
  • IFIF Sustainability Steering Group Chair: Dr. Daniel Bercovici (Ajinomoto Eurolysine)
  • IFIF Executive Director: Alexandra de Athayde

 

IFIF Executive Committee 2016 — 2017

Joel G Newman

Chairman, International Feed Industry Federation, USA

Aidan Connolly

Chief Innovation Officer, Alltech, USA

Alexandra de Athayde

Executive Director, International Feed Industry Federation, Germany

Dr. Daniel Bercovici

President, Ajinomoto Eurolysine S.A.S., France

David Bray

President, Stock Feed Manufacturers’ Council of Australia, Australia

Yang Zhenhai

Secretary General, China Feed Industry Association, China

Dr. Reinder Sijtsma

Director, Nutreco & Treasurer, International Feed Industry Federation, Netherlands

Roberto Betancourt

President, Brazilian Feed Industry Association, Brazil

 

IFIF Board Members 2016 — 2017

Joel G. Newman

Chairman, International Feed Industry Federation, USA

Aidan Connolly

Chief Innovation Officer, Alltech, USA

Alexandra de Athayde

Executive Director, International Feed Industry Federation, Germany

Dr. Christopher Rieker

VP Global Segment Management Animal Nutrition, BASF SE, Germany

Chuck Warta

President, Cargill Premix & Nutrition, USA

Dr. Daniel Bercovici

President, Ajinomoto Eurolysine S.A.S., France

David Bray

President, Stock Feed Manufacturers’ Council of Australia, Australia

De Wet Boshoff

Executive Director, Animal Feed Manufactures Association, South Africa

Enzo Trimigliozzi

Vice President Enzymes and Eubiotcs, DSM, Switzerland

Joerg Seifert

Secretary General, EU Association of Specialty Feed Ingredients and their Mixtures, Belgium

Yang Zhenhai

Secretary General, China Feed Industry Association, China

Luis Azevedo

Executive Director LATAM & Africa, Novus International, Brazil

Melissa Dumont

Executive Director, Animal Nutrition Association of Canada, Canada

Dr. Michael Binder

Director Sustainability Development, Evonik Industries AG, Germany

Dr. Olivier Espeisse

EU Africa Government Affairs Director, Elanco Animal Health, France

Dr. Reinder Sijtsma

Quality Director, Nutreco & Treasurer, International Feed Industry Federation, Netherlands

Roberto Betancourt

President, Brazilian Feed Industry Association, Brazil

Ruud Tijssens

President, European Feed Manufacturers’ Federation, Belgium

 

IFIF Structure

IFIF is registered as a non-profit organization in Luxembourg and was founded on December 1, 1987.

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EXPERT COMMITTEES 2016 — 2017

Experts from member companies and national associations participate in IFIF’s expert and technical committees. These consider key industry issues and help develop global feed and food industry standards.

IFIF Regulatory Committee

Members 2016 – 2017

Chair: Dr. Karine Tanan, Global Regulatory Lead, Cargill

  1. Séverine Deschandelliers, Head of Global Regulatory Affairs, Adisseo
  2. Joel Newman, President & CEO. AFIA
  3. De Wet Boshoff, Executive Director, AFMA
  4. Liesl Breytenbach, Manager: Technical & Regulatory Affairs, AFMA
  5. Melissa Dumont, Executive Director, ANAC
  6. Dr. Ruth Hayler, Director Regulatory Affairs & Quality Compliance, BASF SE
  7. Yinghui Bi, Division of International Cooperation, CFIA
  8. B. Soundararajan, Chairman, CFLMA of India
  9. Gajendra Verma, Executive Director, CLFMA of India
  10. Philippe Becquet, Senior Global Regulatory Affairs Manager, DSM
  11. Dr. Olivier Espeisse, EU Africa Government Affairs Director, Elanco
  12. Dr. Dieter Greissinger, VP Quality & Regulatory Compliance, Evonik
  13. Ruud Huibers, Head Global Regulatory Affairs, EW Nutrition
  14. Manolis Geneiatakis, Secretary General, FAMi-QS
  15. Flavia de Castro, Executive Director, Feedlatina
  16. Alexander Döring, Secretary General FEFAC
  17. Joerg Seifert, Secretary General, FEFANA
  18. John Aird, Executive Manager, FIAAA
  19. Dr. Bernadette Okeke, Global Director and Senior Adviser Regulatory Affairs and Compliance, Lallemand
  20. Gareth Harris, Assoc. Vice President Regulatory Affairs, Merck/MSD Animal Health
  21. Dr. Laurie Hueneke, Executive Director of Policy and Government Relations, Merck/MSD Animal Health
  22. Claire Launay, Research & Development Direction, Neovia
  23. Edward Hamod, General Manager, NFFPM
  24. Elkin Amaya, Executive Manager Global Regulatory Affairs, Novus International
  25. Ruud Tijssens, Director Corporate Affairs, Nuscience, member of Royal Agrifirm Group
  26. Dr. Reinder Sijtsma, Quality Director, Nutreco
  27. Dr. Richard Coulter, Senior Vice President, Phibro Animal Health Corporation
  28. John Spragg, Executive Director, SFMCA
  29. Ariovaldo Zani, CEO, Sindirações
  30. Bruno Caputi, Regulatory / Quality Coordinator, Sindirações

 

IFIF Sustainability Steering Group

Members 2016 – 2017

Chair: Dr. Daniel Bercovici, President, Ajinomoto Eurolysine S.A.S.

  1. Alexandra de Athayde, Executive Director, IFIF
  2. David Bray, President, SFMCA
  3. Joel Newman, President & CEO, AFIA
  4. Joerg Seifert, Secretary General, FEFANA
  5. Dr. Michael Binder, Director Sustainability, Evonik
  6. Mike Goble, COO, Diamond V
  7. Nicolas Martin, Policy Advisor, FEFAC
  8. Philippe Becquet, Senior Global Regulatory Affairs Manager, DSM
  9. Roberto Betancourt, President, Sindirações
  10. Ruud Tijssens, President, FEFAC
  11. Dr. Sebastian Csaki, Senior Advisor, IFIF

 

IFIF Expert Working Group on Guidance on implementation of the Global Harmonized System

Members 2016 – 2017

Chair: Dr. Karine Tanan, Global Regulatory Lead, Cargill

  1. Bernadette Okeke, Director, Regulatory Affairs and Compliance, Lallemand
  2. Bruno Caputi Regulatory, Quality Coordinator, Sindirações
  3. Claire Launay, Director Scientific and Regulatory Affairs, Neovia
  4. Gary Huddleston, Director of Feed Manufacturing and Regulatory Affairs, AFIA
  5. Grit Monse, Member of the FEFAC Premix & Mineral Feed and the Animal Nutrition Committees, FEFAC
  6. Jess McCluer, Vice President Safety and Regulatory Affairs, NGFA
  7. Justyna Maczynska, Regulatory Affairs Manager, Nutreco
  8. Kellie Weilbrenner Director, Regulatory Affairs Diamond V
  9. Luca Capodieci Technical and Regulatory Manager FEFANA
  10. Martin van der Eijk Product Stewardship Lead Cargill
  11. My-Lien Bosch, Technical Analyst ANAC

 

IFIF Expert Working Group on Guidance on International standards for contaminants in feed

Members 2016 – 2017

Chair: John Aird, Executive Manager FIAAA

  1. Arnaud Bouxin, Deputy Secretary General, FEFAC
  2. Aurore Potel, Regulatory Affairs Manager, Phileo
  3. Dr. Bernadette Okeke, Director, Regulatory Affairs and Compliance, Lallemand
  4. Bruno Caputi, Regulatory / Quality Coordinator, Sindirações
  5. Claire Launay, Director Scientific and Regulatory Affairs, Neovia
  6. Cristina Navarro, Head of Quality Assurance – Europe, Middle East & Africa, Novus
  7. Diego Bonilha, Quality Management and Regulatory Affairs, BASF
  8. Eleanor Tredway, Member of FEFANA Expert Groups, FEFANA
  9. Dr. Henrique Anselmo, Regulatory Affairs Manager, Nutreco
  10. Dr. Karine Tanan, Global Regulatory Lead, Cargill
  11. Lori Flugum, Director, Quality & Compliance, Diamond V
  12. Melissa Dumont, Executive Director, ANAC
  13. Richard Sellers, Sr. Vice President, Public Policy and Education, AFIA
  14. Dr. Ruth Hayler, Director Regulatory Affairs & Quality Compliance, BASF SE
  15. Dr. Stephan Bornemann, Quality Manager, Kaesler Nutrition
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DEFINITIONS AND TERMS

The page below breaks down some common terms and definitions used throughout this online report.

Definitions

Feed (Feeding Stuff)
Any single or multiple materials, whether processed, semi- processed or raw, which is intended to be fed directly to food-producing animals.

Feed Ingredient
A component part or constituent of any combination or mixture making up a feed, whether or not it has a nutritional value in the animal’s diet, including feed additives. Ingredients are of plant, animal or aquatic origin, or other organic or inorganic substances.

Feed Additive
Any intentionally added ingredient not normally consumed as feed by itself, whether or not it has nutritional value, which affects the characteristics of feed or animal products. Micro-organisms, enzymes, acidity regulators, trace elements, vitamins and other products fall within the scope of this definition depending on the purpose of use and method of administration.

Medicated Feed
Any feed which contains veterinary drugs as defined in the Codex Alimentarius Commission Procedural Manual.

 

Terms

Complete Feed
A nutritionally adequate feed compounded by a specific formula to be fed as the sole ration and capable of maintaining life and/or promoting production without any additional substance except water.

Concentrate
A feed used with another to improve the nutritive balance of the total and intended to be diluted or mixed to produce a supplement or a complete feed; may be unsafe if fed free choice or alone as a supplement.

Micro-ingredients
Vitamins, minerals, antibiotics, drugs/medicines, and other materials usually required in feeds in small amounts as feed additives.

Premix
A uniform mixture of one or more microingredients/ additives with a diluent and/ or carrier to facilitate their even distribution in a larger mix.

Primary feed
A feed formulated from single ingredients, sometimes containing a premix (less than less than 45.5 kg per tonne or 100 pounds per tonne).

Trace Minerals
Mineral nutrients required by animals in micro amounts (measured in units of grams per kg or smaller).

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IFIF CONTACT

For general enquiries please contact us via email.

Postal address

International Feed Industry Federation – IFIF
P.O. Box 1340
51657 Wiehl
Germany

Email

info@ifif.org

Registered address

International Feed Industry Federation a.s.b.l.
7 rue Alcide de Gasperi
L-1013 Luxembourg R.C.S.
Luxembourg F 4.483

International Feed
Industry Federation

ANNUAL REPORT 2016/17

Welcome

  • In 2050 there will be over 9 billion people in the world… and the need for food will be 60% higher than today.

    It is vital that the feed sector, as well as the wider agricultural chain, can meet future demands in a sustainable, safe and affordable manner, while maintaining consumer trust and confidence in the food supply chain.

  • In the last two years the International Feed Industry Federation (IFIF) has grown from strength to strength thanks to the engagement of our members from around the world and a sharp focus on our vision and mission as the one voice for the global feed industry.

    We invite you to explore the 2016/17 IFIF Annual Report and see for yourself.

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IFIF’s partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

In 2016 and 2017 IFIF and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) continued to strengthen their collaborative relationship with a number of key strategic initiatives, including IFRM and Capacity Development for feed safety.

The IFIF FAO collaboration has become a prominent example of how the public and private sector can work together in a number of key areas, which positively impact the feed and food chain.

Already in 2005 the FAO and IFIF, recognising their common interest in promoting the safe supply of animal feed throughout the world, signed a formal Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which continues to form the basis of collaboration between the two organisations.

One highlight of the IFIF and the FAO Animal Production and Health Division, are efforts to facilitate dialogue between the private and public sector on key issues affecting the feed and food chain. This includes the annual International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM), which brings together feed regulators and industry from around the world, as well as the tri-annual Global Feed and Food Congress series, which includes representatives from the whole feed and food chain, as well as government, academia, other intergovernmental organizations and NGOs.

The 5th Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC) was successfully held in Antalya, Turkey, on 18-20 April 2016 and was organized with technical support provided by the FAO. IFIF and FAO are already working on the 6th Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC), which will be held in Bangkok, Thailand, on 10-13 March 2019. For more information please visit gffc2016.com.

A second key area of collaboration is capacity development in feed safety and spreading of good feed manufacturing practices. IFIF is a founding partner of the FAO-led Feed Safety Multi-Stakeholder Partnership, which was formally launched in April 2016 and aims at improving the safety of feed, and thus enhancing food safety, animal health and welfare and food security.

The Feed Safety Multi-Stakeholder Partnership is undertaking a number of initiatives to support feed safety:

As global compound feed production continues to expand, especially in the developing world, IFIF continues to work with the FAO on Capacity Development for Feed Safety, an important effort that will continue on in the next years.

Since its launch in 2010 the FAO/IFIF “Manual of Good Practices for the Feed Industry” has been published in English, Chinese, Arabic, French and Spanish and distributed widely to regulators and industry. IFIF is also engaged in the recent efforts by the FAO to develop the capacities of relevant stakeholders globally to ensure the production and supply of safe feed based on latest Codex standards and good practices.

The IFIF FAO collaboration has become a prominent example of how the public and private sector can work together in a number of key areas, which positively impact the feed and food chain. IFIF’s relationship with the FAO continues to strengthen with IFIF’s participation in the Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock, as an official stakeholder in the Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership and the FAO’s Private Sector Initiative. IFIF will continue to be strongly engaged in these efforts.

Welcome Letters

JOEL G. NEWMAN

Chairman IFIF 2016/17

IFIF provides a unified leadership for our industry in the food chain that provides sustainable, safe, nutritious and affordable food for a growing world population.

+ READ MORE

ALEXANDRA DE ATHAYDE

Executive Director IFIF

IFIF believes that only by working together with all stakeholders can we continue to ensure feed and food safety, while meeting the global demands for food.

+ READ MORE

  • JOEL G. NEWMAN

    Chairman IFIF 2016/17

    IFIF provides a unified leadership for our industry in the food chain that provides sustainable, safe, nutritious and affordable food for a growing world population.

    + READ MORE

  • ALEXANDRA DE ATHAYDE

    Executive Director IFIF

    IFIF believes that only by working together with all stakeholders can we continue to ensure feed and food safety, while meeting the global demands for food.

    + READ MORE

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What we do

Given the anticipated growth of the world’s population to around 9 billion people by 2050, and the associated higher demand for animal proteins like beef, poultry and fish, it is vital that we can meet this challenge in a sustainable and safe way.

In 2016-2017, IFIF continued to focus on its strategy and the following five-point mission to fully support our vision:

  • Represent the global feed industry with international governmental organizations and agencies, including the FAO, WTO, WHO, OIE and CODEX Aliment Arius, on crucial global feed and food issues.
  • Promote science-based solutions and information sharing for the feed industry by facilitating global forums, such as the Global Feed & Food Congress (GFFC) and the International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM).
  • Promote a balanced regulatory framework to support a fair global playing field, facilitate market access and support the competitiveness of the feed and livestock industries.
  • Expand the global network of national and regional feed associations and promote the adoption of international standards and global equivalency.
  • Continue to support and encourage the sustainable development of animal production.
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IFIF official liaison status with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)

In 2017 IFIF was granted official liaison status with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee ISO/TC34/SC10 to work on animal feeding stuffs.

The scope of this Technical Committee (TC) is ‘Standardization in the field of animal feeding stuffs including: terminology, sampling, methods of test and analysis in quality control, specifications of raw material & finished product, guidelines and requirements for packaging, storage and transportation’.

Currently the TC is working on establishing Animal feeding stuffs Terminology and you can find more details about this Committee here https://www.iso.org/committee/47924.html and about ISO here: https://www.iso.org.

IFIF will continue to engage and support the work of ISO/TC34/SC10 to ensure that it is aligned with other international initiatives related to animal feed terminology.

Our Vision

IFIF’s vision is to provide a unified voice and leadership to represent and promote the global feed industry as an essential participant in the food chain that provides sustainable, safe, nutritious and affordable food for a growing world population.

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Challenge

In 2016 world compound feed production reached an estimated one billion tonnes annually. Global commercial feed manufacturing generates an estimated annual turnover of over US $400 billion.

The last years have continued to see an increase in the demand for animal protein worldwide, including for livestock, dairy and fish. Generally we have seen a growth of production particularly in the developing world, with the developed world remaining more or less stable.

2016 GLOBAL ANIMAL FEED PRODUCTION IS CA.1 BILLION TONNES WORTH OVER $400 BILLION

GLOBAL COMPOUND FEED PRODUCTION 2016 (MIO. T)
Source: IFIF / FEFAC

EVOLUTION OF GLOBAL COMPOUND FEED PRODUCTION (INDEX 100 = 1999)

Source: FEFAC – Alltech – Feed International

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that by 2050 the demand for food will grow by 60% and that between 2010 and 2050 production of animal proteins is expected to grow by around 1.7% per year, with meat production projected to rise by nearly 70%, aquaculture by 90% and dairy by 55%.

This should be good news for the feed industry and our partners along the agri-food chain. However such growth comes with significant challenges and it is vital that our sector, as well as the wider agricultural chain, can meet these demands in a sustainable, safe and affordable manner, while maintaining consumer trust and confidence in the food supply chain.

This challenge is a global one and IFIF is a global organization. Our members are made up of national and regional feed associations, feed related organizations, and corporations, which represent over 80% of worldwide animal compound feed production.

IFIF’s vision is to provide a unified voice and leadership to represent and promote the global feed industry as an essential participant in the food chain that provides sustainable, safe, nutritious and affordable food for a growing world population.

In 2050 there will be over 9 billion people in the world… and the need for food will be 60% higher than today. How do we feed this population?

To support our industry on the road to the future, IFIF’s work with its Members and stakeholders is focussed on three strategic pillars, including (i) sustainability, (ii) regulatory matters and international standards, and (iii) supporting education and sharing of best practices.

Under these pillars IFIF has undertaken a number of strategic projects, which are outlined in this annual report.

world-protein-production-2016-17

 

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IFIF collaboration with Codex Alimentarius as a Codex-recognized NGO

As a Codex recognized NGO, IFIF follows and inputs into in the work of the relevant Codex Committees and participates in Codex Side Events addressing feed safety for safe food.

In 2016 and 2017 IFIF joined global regulators at the annual Sessions of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, where together with the FAO, we held a number of side meetings related to feed safety. Feed safety is relevant to Codex Alimentarius Commission work as it impacts on the safety of food.

IFIF has been actively involved in the development of the Codex Code of Practice of Good Animal Feeding and was an active member of the ad hoc Codex Intergovernmental Task Force on Animal Feeding (TF AF).

As a Codex recognized NGO, IFIF follows and inputs into in the work of the relevant Committees and participates in Codex Side Events addressing feed safety for safe food.

In 2016 and 2017 IFIF was actively involved in a number of Codex Working groups including participation in the eWG on the carry-over of unintentional residues of veterinary drugs in feed (CCVRDF), as well in the eWG on revision of the classification of food and feed (CCPR). In addition, in 2016 IFIF participated in the pre-consultation of documents for the Physical WG on Codex work on AMR and send IFIF delegates to the Physical WG.

In 2017 IFIF also contributed to the eWG on the Revision of the Code of Practice to Minimize and Contain Antimicrobial Resistance, and is part of the on-going EWG on Revision of the Code of Practice for the prevention and reduction of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs in Food and Feed (CAC/RCP 62-2006) (CCCF) as well as the EWG on Guidance on regulatory approaches to third party assurance schemes in food safety and fair practices in the food trade (CCFICS).

This work will continue into 2018 and supports IFIF’s on-going efforts to keep feed safety issues on the Codex agenda following the completion of the work of the Codex Task Force on Animal Feeding (TF AF) in 2013.

One Voice

Who we are

ONE VOICE FOR THE INDUSTRY

+ READ MORE

What we do

OUR MISSION

+ READ MORE

Challenge

TOWARDS 2050

+ READ MORE

Members

ACROSS THE WORLD

+ READ MORE

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Members

IFIF is made up of national and regional feed associations from Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, North and South America and the Middle East, as well feed related organizations and corporate members from around the globe.

IFIF is a membership driven organization and we want to thank all IFIF Members for their strong support of IFIF’s work, projects and mission to ensure the feed industry continues to be seen as an essential participant in the food chain that provides sustainable, safe and nutritious food.

IFIF members represent over 80% of total compound animal feed production worldwide.

IFIF is very pleased to welcome those new members to the IFIF family who joined the Federation in in 2016 and 2017. They are all key players in their field and IFIF is extremely pleased to have them on board contributing their time and expertise to support IFIF’s vision and mission. We would like to welcome the Iran Feed Industry Association (IFIA), which joined IFIF as a national association member.

We also would like to welcome our new corporate members to IFIF, including BIOMIN Holding GmbH, Diamond V, Kaesler Animal Nutrition, Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Nuscience – member of the Royal Agrifirm Group and Phileo Lesaffre Animal Care.

These organisations are critical players in the feed production chain and we are very pleased to be able to draw on their expertise and support as members and benefit from their global reach and regional expertise.

We want to thank all IFIF Members for their strong support of IFIF’s work, projects and mission.

IFIF is a membership driven organization and together with our Members we work to ensure the feed industry continues to be seen as an essential participant in the food chain that provides sustainable, safe, nutritious and affordable food for a growing world population.

IFIF Members

National and Regional Associations

Corporate Members

Feed Related Organisations
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IFIF Cooperation Agreement World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)

The OIE IFIF cooperation further aims to strengthen links between feed safety and food safety. IFIF works with the OIE to contribute to improved animal health and productivity, which in the end leads to a positive contribution to public health.

In 2016 and 2017 IFIF continued to strengthen its relationship with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and input in the development, updating and implementation of OIE standards and guidelines to contribute to improved animal health and productivity.

IFIF joined the 84th and 85th OIE General Session in Paris in 2016 and 2017 respectively, highlighting the cooperation between IFIF and OIE, in particular with regards to the prevention and management of infectious diseases, including zoonotic diseases, is vital and our cooperation should strengthen linkages between feed safety and food safety.

The OIE IFIF cooperation further aims to strengthen links between feed safety and food safety. IFIF works with the OIE to contribute to improved animal health and productivity, which in the end leads to a positive contribution to public health.

 

Partnerships

In 2016/17 IFIF strengthened its work with key international organisations along the feed and food chain, to support feed and food safety and fair trade, while meeting the increased demands of food sustainably.

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Working with partners across the Agri-Food chain

IFIF strongly believes all partners along the agri chain have to work together to ensure sustainable and safe feed and food in the future.

IFIF works closely with other chain partners with the objective to find a common voice to address the challenges and opportunities in the agri chain, including with the following organisations:

  • HealthforAnimals
  • International Dairy Federation (IDF)
  • International Egg Commission (IEC)
  • International Fertilizer Association (IFA)
  • International Marine Ingredients Organization (IFFO)
  • International Meat Secretariat (IMS)
  • International Poultry Council (IPC)

In 2016 and 2017, IFIF worked on a number of strategic join initiatives with these partners, including coordinating input and efforts at the FAO-led LEAP Partnership, the Global Agenda and the FAO Private Sector Initiative.

Our Pillars

To support our industry on the road to the future, in 2016/17 IFIF’s work is focussed on three strategic pillars:

Sustainability
Regulatory & International Standards
Education & Best Practices

Our Three Pillars

Regional Updates

IFIF Members include national and regional feed associations from around the globe, including from Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, North and South America and the Middle East. Here you will find our Association Members’ 2016/17 updates on their particular region, including feed production figures.